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The ANU College of Law Centre for Commercial Law is a centre of excellence in private and government commercial law reform, advice and policy evaluation, and a leader in commercial law research and teaching. It also provides a national forum for academics, practitioners and regulators working in private and government commercial law.

Director

Anne McNaughton

Contact us

Anne McNaughton

anne.mcnaughton@anu.edu.au

Research themes

  • Private Law
  • Regulatory Law and Policy

Our members

Pauline Bomball
Stephen Bottomley
Jolyon Ford
Darryn Jensen
Anne McNaughton
Pauline Ridge
Cameron Roles
Peta Spender

About CCL

The ANU College of Law Centre for Commercial Law is a centre of excellence in private and government commercial law reform, advice and policy evaluation, and a leader in commercial law research and teaching. It also provides a national forum for academics, practitioners and regulators working in private and government commercial law.

We host an annual conference as well as regular seminars and workshops. Our members also run consultancies for legal practitioners, government and the business community on commercial law issues, particularly as they affect government commercial practice.

Our researchers specialise in emerging commercial law areas, particularly corporatisation, privatisation, government contracting, globalisation and international aspects of commercial law. 

Research and projects undertaken at the Centre also cover 'traditional' areas of commercial practice such as bankruptcy and insolvency, companies, securities, contracts, equity, intellectual property, personal property securities, trade practices and taxation.

The Centre was established in 1998 and its current director is Pauline Ridge.

News

Associate Professor Kath Hall

An international, interdisciplinary research project into sport integrity led by Associate Professor Kath Hall from The Australian National University (ANU) College of Law has contributed to the design of a new government agency to clamp down on match-fixing, doping and corruption.

Australian Parliament

By Daniel Stewart
Senior Lecturer, ANU College of Law

Although the Federal Government might not consider a pandemic to be the best time to consult with the public on legislation establishing a Commonwealth Integrity Commission, there is one public consultation occurring now that might have the potential to transform transparency and accountability of government.

Image shows ANU Law Dean Sally Wheeler

A research article examining Australian corporations’ policy commitment to human rights by Professor Sally Wheeler OBE, MRIA, FAcSS, FAAL, Dean of The Australian National University (ANU) College of Law and Pro-Vice Chancellor (International Strategy), has been shortlisted for the Socio-Legal Studies Association (SLSA) Article Prize 2021.

New book examines fresh developments in contract law

A new textbook co-authored by two scholars from The Australian National University (ANU) College of Law aims to provide students with the essential knowledge and skills in contract law to succeed in their studies and professional practice.

The Responsible Shareholder

When companies cause harm to the environment, inflict injury on workers, or commit financial fraud, we're used to seeing directors, managers, advisers or regulators come under scrutiny. By contrast, shareholders have been relatively safe from criticism or condemnation in the eyes of the law and conventional morality.

Are shareholders passive agents whose interests start and end with dividends, or do they have a responsibility to drive ‘principled profit’ in the context of environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues?

Graduate study

Members of the Centre for Commercial Law are involved in teaching a variety of courses at both undergraduate and postgraduate level at ANU Law.

The ANU Master of Laws offers a flexible coursework structure which enables students to undertake a variety of courses. Most courses are taught intensively over periods of two to six days.

Courses may also be studied as a single subject without being part of a full award program or degree. You can take any one of our 80+ Masters courses as a single subject with assessment. This is called ‘non-award study’.

Courses in the Masters Program can also be undertaken on a Professional Development basis where students attend the intensive days but do not complete the assessment nor receive a grade for the course.

Members of the Centre are also available to supervise research students in commercial law topics. For further information, see the Higher Degree Research page.