Publications

This is a searchable catalogue of the College's most recent books, book chapters, journal articles and working papers. The ANU College of Law also publishes a Research Paper Series on SSRN.

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The Food and Agricultural Organization and Food Security in the Context of International Intellectual Property Rights Protection

Author(s):

This chapter identifies the causes of chronic food insecurity as a form of market failure facilitated by the rules of international intellectual property law, as primarily embodied in the Agreement on the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). While acknowledging that food insecurity is not a problem solely created by the post-TRIPS legal environment, this chapter argues that the legal rules on intellectual property play a significant role in supporting and encouraging those market forces that adversely impact upon the access, availability and affordability of food, and in causing significant disruptions to the traditional farming practices of farmers in the Global South. International responses, orchestrated by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), to the food security problem in the context of agriculture, comprising the movement towards farmer’s rights and the right to food, have offered some useful solutions to the crisis. After examining the legal frameworks relevant to food security, this chapter provides three critiques of FAO’s response to the problem of food security with the finding that the regime conflict deprives FAO of a useful role in norm creation, effective administration of food security, and reconciliation of ‘norm collision’ to overcome a property-type policy response.

Read on SSRN

Centre: CCL

Research theme: International Law, Law and Technology, Private Law

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The Centralisation of Judicial Power within the Australian Federal System

Author(s): James Stellios

This article considers the patterns of centralisation within the federal judicial system. While centralisation of legislative, executive and fiscal power within the federal system has been well documented, the architecture of judicial federalism has been the subject of less attention. The article, first, seeks to show that principles derived from Chapter III of the Constitution have, on the whole, exhibited broadly similar centralising characteristics and exerted centralising effects, and, secondly, offers explanations for this centralisation.

Read on SSRN

Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Constitutional Law and Theory, International Law

Gender Quotas on Boards -- Is it Time for Australia to Lean in?

Author(s): Peta Spender

This article examines whether Australia should introduce a gender quota on ASX 200 boards. Although existing institutional arrangements favour voluntary initiatives, Australia may be at a critical juncture where two factors — the public, pragmatic nature of the statutory regulation of corporations in Australia and the current salience of gender as a political issue — may favour the introduction of a quota. In particular, Australian policy-makers may be amenable to change by observing initiatives from other jurisdictions. It is argued that we should maintain a healthy scepticism about functionalist arguments such as the business case for women on boards. Rather, we should invoke enduring justifications such as equality, parity and democratic legitimacy to support a quota. The optimal design of an Australian gender board quota will be also be explored.

Read on SSRN

Centre: CCL

Research theme: Law and Gender, Law and Social Justice, Private Law, Regulatory Law and Policy

Administrative decision making

Administrative Decision-Making in Australian Migration Law

Author(s):

The ANU College of Law, Migration Law Program is pleased to introduce a text in administrative decision-making in Australian migration law. Over the past eight years we have assembled a team of some of Australia’s most highly qualified migration agents and migration law specialists to deliver the Graduate Certificate in Australian Migration Law & Practice, and the Master of Laws in Migration Law. Through personal recollections and a comprehensive analysis of administrative decision-making, Alan Freckelton brings his professional expertise and experience in this complex field of law to the fore. The examination of High Court decisions, parliamentary speeches and public opinion bring a contentious area of law and policy to life, enabling the reader to consider the impact that legislation and decision-making has upon the individual and society as a whole.

Find online at ANU Press

Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Migration and Movement of Peoples

Zine's The High Court and the Constitution

Zines's The High Court and the Constitution

Author(s): James Stellios

It has been seven years since the last edition of Professor Zines’s classic book, The High Court and the Constitution. In that time the High Court has handed down a range of important decisions transforming, extending and developing existing constitutional law principles. In this 6th edition of the book, by Dr James Stellios, analyses and critiques the High Court’s jurisprudence over that period. Changes have been made to all chapters to update the existing law. The most significant updates relate to: the reformulation of the Commonwealth’s executive power to contract and spend following the High Court’s decisions in Pape and the two Williams cases; the High Court’s continuing development of Chapter III principles, particularly its renewed interest in the Kable limitation on State Parliaments; the uncertainties appearing in recent High Court cases on the implied freedom of political communication; and the High Court’s application of s 92 to national markets in the internet-based new economy.

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Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Constitutional Law and Theory

Legal perspectives on Security Institutions

Legal Perspectives on Security Institutions

Editor(s): Kim Rubenstein

Due to the continuing expansion of the notion of security, various national, regional and international institutions now find themselves addressing contemporary security issues. While institutions may evolve by adjusting themselves to new challenges, they can also fundamentally alter the intricate balance between security and current legal frameworks. This volume explores the tensions that occur when institutions address contemporary security threats, in both public and international law contexts. As part of the Connecting International with Public Law series, it provides important and valuable insights into the legal issues and perspectives which surround the institutional responses to contemporary security challenges. It is essential reading for scholars, practitioners and policy makers seeking to understand the legal significance of security institutions and the implications of their evolution on the rule of law and legitimacy.

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Centre: CIPL, CMSL

Research theme: Human Rights Law and Policy

Regulating Business for Peace

Regulating Business for Peace: The United Nations, the Private Sector, and Post-Conflict Recovery

Author(s): Jolyon Ford

This book addresses gaps in thinking and practice on how the private sector can both help and hinder the process of building peace after armed conflict. It argues that weak governance in fragile and conflict-affected societies creates a need for international authorities to regulate the social impact of business activity in these places as a special interim duty. Policymaking should seek appropriate opportunities to engage with business while harnessing its positive contributions to sustainable peace. However, scholars have not offered frameworks for what is considered 'appropriate' engagement or properly theorised techniques for how best to influence responsible business conduct. United Nations peace operations are peak symbols of international regulatory responsibilities in conflict settings, and debate continues to grow around the private sector's role in development generally. This book is the first to study how peace operations have engaged with business to influence its peace-building impact.

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Centre: CCL, CIPL, LGDI

Research theme: Human Rights Law and Policy, Law, Governance and Development

Accessories in Private Law

Accessories in private law

Author(s): Pauline Ridge, Joachim Dietrich

Accessory liability is an often neglected but very important topic across all areas of private law. By providing a principled analytical framework for the law of accessories and identifying common themes and problems that arise in the law, this book provides much-needed clarity. It explains the fundamental concepts that are used to impose liability on accessories, particularly the conduct and mental elements of liability: 'involvement' in the primary wrong and (generally) knowledge. It also sets out in detail the specific rules and principles of liability as these operate in different areas of common law, equity and statute. A comparative study across common law and criminal law jurisdictions, including the United States, also sheds new light on what is and what is not accessory liability.

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Centre: CCL

Research theme: Criminal Law, International Law, Private Law

Europe at the Edge of Pluralism

Europe at the Edge of Pluralism

Editor(s): , Magdalena Kmak

This volume tackles contemporary problems of legal accommodation of diversity in Europe and recent developments in the area in diverse European legal regimes. Despite professing the motto 'Unity in Diversity,' Europe appears to be struggling with discord rather than unity. Legal discussions reflect a crisis when it comes to matters of migration, accommodation of minorities, and dealing with the growing heterogeneity of European societies. The book illustrates that the current legal conundrums stem from European oscillation between, on the one hand, acknowledging the need of accommodation, and, on the other, the tendencies to preserve existing legal traditions. It claims that these opposite tendencies have led Europe to the edge of pluralism. This 'edge' - just as with the linguistic interpretation of the word 'edge' - carries multiple meanings, conveying a plethora of problems encountered by law when dealing with diversity. The book explores and illustrates these multiple 'edges of pluralism,' tracing back their origins and examining the contemporary legal conundrums they have led to.

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Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Human Rights Law and Policy, Law and Gender, Law and Religion, Migration and Movement of Peoples

Nanotechnology: Toward the Sustainocene

Nanotechnology Toward the Sustainocene

Editor(s):

While the sustainability of our world is being endangered or destroyed by the misguided activities of artificial human entities, real people have begun to expand their moral sympathies sufficiently to prioritize protecting our world’s interests. They have developed a new technology - nanotechnology - that has the potential to advance human society toward a period of long-term sustainability, termed "the Sustainocene". This book comprises chapters by experts in various fields of nanotechnology and in related areas of governance under the theme of how nanotechnology can assist in the creation of the Sustainocene. The book will appeal to anyone involved in nanotechnology, macromolecular science, public policy related to sustainability, renewable energy, and climate change.

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Centre: CIPL

Research theme:

The Politics of Jurisprudence

The Politics and Jurisprudence of the Chaudhry Court 2005-2013

Editor(s): Moeen Cheema, Ijaz Shafi Gilani

Former Chief Justice of Pakistan Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhryas tenure, from 2005 to 2013, has been characterized by remarkable developments in constitutional politics and the jurisprudence of the apex court. This was also a period of great controversy and the actions of the Chaudhry Court polarized the debate on the role of the Supreme Court. Despite the emergence of such vociferous debate, a detailed scrutiny of the Chaudhry Courtas actions has thus far been lacking. This volume represents an attempt to fill this gap by closely analysing the jurisprudence of the Supreme Court and reflects on the likely legacy of Chief Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhryas tenure. The contributions also constitute an effort at deepening the debate that has surrounded the courtas actions during the last few years. It goes beyond the critique of the court on the grounds that it has acted politically and violated the constitutionally mandated separation of powers between the judiciary, the legislature, and the elected executive.

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Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Constitutional Law and Theory

The Law of the Sea

The Oxford Handbook of The Law of the Sea

Editor(s): Donald Rothwell, Alex G Oude Elferink, Karen N Scott, Tim Stephens

This book provides a landmark study into the law of the sea, taking stock of the majors developments, core concepts, and key challenges within this fundamental area of law. Written by over forty expert contributors, both eminent scholars and leading practitioners, it explores the most important issues facing the world's oceans and seas, including piracy, climate change, and military operations.

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Centre: CMSL

Research theme: International Law

Legal Psychology in Australia

Legal Psychology in Australia

Author(s): Mark Nolan, Jane Goodman-Delahunty

Legal Psychology in Australia is an introductory book aimed at enabling the teaching of legal psychology to law students, (forensic) psychology students, criminology students, and a range of students from diverse professions (eg. social work, psychiatric nursing, mediation, policy-makers, and investigative journalism) relevant to the legal system. Authored by experienced empirical legal psychological researchers and teachers Mark Nolan and Jane Goodman-Delahunty, Legal Psychology in Australia will encourage law students to learn more about the psychological evidence base that can and should be used as the basis for law reform and the analysis of Australian law in action.

Order your copy online

Centre: CMSL, LGDI

Research theme:

Administrative Decision-Making in Australian Migration Law

Administrative Decision-Making in Australian Migration Law

Editor(s):

The ANU College of Law, Migration Law Program is pleased to introduce a text in administrative decision-making in Australian migration law. Over the past eight years we have assembled a team of some of Australia’s most highly qualified migration agents and migration law specialists to deliver the Graduate Certificate in Australian Migration Law & Practice, and the Master of Laws in Migration Law.

Alan Freckelton has worked with the Migration Law Program since 2008. Through personal recollections and a comprehensive analysis of administrative decision-making, he brings his professional expertise and experience in this complex field of law to the fore. The examination of High Court decisions, parliamentary speeches and public opinion bring a contentious area of law and policy to life, enabling the reader to consider the impact that legislation and decision-making has upon the individual and society as a whole.

Free download or order a printed copy

Centre: CIPL, CMSL, LRSJ

Research theme: Migration and Movement of Peoples

‘Working Collaboratively, Holistically and Strategically in and with Community – The Power of Community Development in Legal Education’ (Presentation Slides)

Author(s): Elizabeth Curran

“You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…Until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it” Atticus Finch, To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee.

I have been asked to answer the following questions today: 1. What is Community Development 2. What it means in terms of approach 3. To provide examples of when I have used it in my work 4. To distill any examples of how it is done 5. To discuss how to evaluate its impact and worth and 6. To examine why it might be a core service of CLCs. 7. Dome key challenges in terms of funding and funders.

Now in Australia we have the empirical data that had been lacking to support anecdotally what had been observed by some service providers over many years. These empirical studies not only demonstrated that similar issues arise in Australia for people who are the recipients of legal assistance services (largely people on social support or with incomes of under $26,000K) but that inroads could be made by joined- up services both legal and non-legal, holistic approaches, community legal education that reaches out and is targeted and responsive to community needs and behaviour. The studies confirmed that the direction of many legal assistance services to work collaboratively, holistically and strategically to assist people, to educate them and to work towards law reform to ensure that recurring problems are all critical if access to the legal system and equality before the law are to be attained.

CLCs have a vital role as community agencies along with others to enable community members to have and find a voice.

“If funders and the community want the legal assistance sector to make a difference in solving people’s problems and advancing and protecting community rights then they must recognize the need to approach problems strategically and use various approaches to obtain results. To achieve this, organizations must be given a level of autonomy that frees them up to use their skills, experience and knowledge of the system as well as the client's actual circumstances to decide the best strategy.”

Read on SSRN

Centre:

Research theme: Human Rights Law and Policy, Indigenous Peoples and the Law, Law and Social Justice, Legal Education

Building Capacity to Cope with Ethical Dilemmas in Legal Practice Through Teaching ‘Giving Voice to Values’ Techniques (Presentation Slides)

Author(s): Elizabeth Curran

This panel presentation will be a basic introduction for a more detailed session on Saturday with Viv Holmes, Anneka Ferguson (in absencia) which will discuss the theory, practice, research and student responses that informs our courses.

In the context of Recommendations 6 and 7 Critical issues and challenges are presented. How can teachers challenge students to explore ethical dilemmas emerging in all area of practice be they commercial, property, consumer and civil law? How can we as teachers not just teach students to identify ethical issues but also assist them in building the tools necessary to actively and appropriately deal with such dilemmas?

In the ANU Legal Workshop (delivered in a blended mode with face to face and on-line teaching) the professional legal training course for graduates to become admitted to legal practice, we use Mary Gentile’s ‘Giving Voice to Values’ (GVV) approach. This will be briefly explained.

I have taught ethics in an undergraduate context and am now teaching at graduate levels and see more opportunities using the GVV approach. In Legal Workshop’s Ethics subject and in a subject, ‘Professional Development’ (PM) that supports key practice areas, we use GVV to engage students at a deeper level so they learn about themselves and their working environment. The key GVV approach is to equip students with not only the ability to identify an ethical problems but also strategies to enable them to act on their ethical duties.

Our aim is to build the students’ resilience, build their capacity to act ethically and speak up appropriately and wisely.

During my section of the panel presentation, I will ask the audience to participate by doing the first exercise students undertake- a Professional Development Journal Entry. This activity is based on GVV’s ‘Tale of Two Stories’ and requires students to recall and then reflect on a time in their lives when they have, and have not, ‘spoken’ their values. The activity is a useful lead-in to tackling ethical issues in legal workplace scenarios as the course progresses (tomorrow’s session). This activity starts the reflective practice conversation and flags issues that emerging lawyers face in responding ethically. In student debriefs some of our students (many of whom work in legal practice as para-legals, judges associates, waitressing, marketing and fact food outlets etc.) indicate they already often encounter unethical practice and that examining the reasons why they speak or do not speak out is useful for the later exercises. The discussion also has scope for teachers to share their experiences, values and ethical dilemmas and how they did or not deal with them. In the follow-up session on Saturday we will explore how the GVV approach enables students to develop and practise skill for acting ethically. It is suggested a similar activity could be used in undergraduate level to start reflective practice and the values and ethics discussion with students earlier.

Read on SSRN

Centre: CLAH

Research theme: Human Rights Law and Policy, Indigenous Peoples and the Law, Law and Social Justice, Legal Education

'CLCs Having an Impact on Lives - Strategic Approaches to Problem Solving’ (Presentation Slides)

Author(s): Elizabeth Curran

Theme - Advancing (by discovering and creating, developing innovative ideas and strategies, including and incorporating the learning and perspectives of others):

Strategic thinking can and has enabled the benefits of early intervention and prevention of legal problems and their escalation. This goes beyond one-to-one case work and can address problem at their core. This paper will explore easy, useable, relevant and replicable results of research evaluations undertaken by Curran of what is effective legal service action that has prevented the public from having to go through the same problem and thus enhancing service impact. Reflective practice is a key way to inform strategic action and continuous learning and how this can be done will also be explored.

This paper examines case studies from CLCs, good practice, responsiveness, strategic thinking and processes that foster having significant impact. It will share how to, up to date action research, facilitate sharing of experiences through the session’s interactive approach.

The session will take an adult learning approach to delivery meaning it will involve centres in discussion about their experiences rather than being in a traditional or lecture mode of delivery. People in the room have expertise and skills that can be shared by all in participants in the session.

Read on SSRN

Centre:

Research theme: Human Rights Law and Policy, Indigenous Peoples and the Law, Law and Social Justice, Legal Education

Criminal Law and Procedure in New South Wales

Hayes & Eburn Criminal Law and Procedure in New South Wales

Author(s): Michael Eburn, Roderick N Howie, Paul Sattler

Hayes & Eburn Criminal Law and Procedure in New South Wales states the basic principles and provides the fundamental source material required for a study of New South Wales criminal law and procedure. It examines the substantive law in a procedural and evidentiary context. Hayes & Eburn Criminal Law and Procedure in New South Wales is specifically designed to meet the needs of students who will be studying criminal law over one semester. The text covers all the learning requirements prescribed in the Legal Profession Admission Rules 2005 (NSW). It gives students the thorough grounding they need in the basic principles of the criminal justice system before moving to the detail of their application in an expanding range of discrete contexts. It also provides practitioners with an introduction to the principal authorities and statutory provisions governing the practice of criminal law in New South Wales. While this book remains unique for its strong focus on the jurisprudence of the New South Wales criminal courts, the principles explored in it will also assist in understanding the criminal law of all Australian jurisdictions.

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Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Criminal Law

Laying Down the Law

Laying Down the Law

Author(s): Robin Creyke, Catriona Cook, Robert Stanley Geddes, David Hamer, Tristan S Taylor

Fully revised and expanded, this ninth edition of Laying Down the Law provides an invaluable introduction to the study of law. It includes clear and engaging explanations of essential foundation topics include Australia’s legal system and sources of law while discussion of current issues assists readers to understand the context in which our legal system operates. The comprehensive coverage of precedent and statutory interpretation provides a solid basis for legal study and practice, and the margin glossary identifies, explains and demystifies legal terms. Practical examples and exercises support learning and the development of key skills. New to this edition is a chapter on the legal profession and professional legal practice and ethics.

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Centre: CCL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Criminal Law, Private Law, Regulatory Law and Policy

Rehabilitiation and Compensation Act 1988

Annotated Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 (10th ed)

Author(s): , John Oman Ballard, Allan Anforth

The 10th edition of this well known reference book provides the full text of the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act as at 1 April 2014, together with comprehensive annotations, organised on a section-by-section basis, covering all significant decisions of the High Court, the Federal Court and the Administrative Appeals Tribunal on the Act. The book has up-to-date discussion of recent litigation concerning the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act, including "reasonable administrative action taken in a reasonable manner", liability for injuries in the course of employment, and construction of the approved Guide. It also includes a list of all legislative instruments published in the Gazette or entered in the Register of Legislative Instruments, and consideration of military compensation arrangements under the Act where the date of injury was before 1 July 2004. Canberra barrister Allan Anforth has contributed an expanded Practitioner's Guide aimed at claimants under the Act and their advocates.

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Centre: CCL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Regulatory Law and Policy

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Updated:  10 August 2015/Responsible Officer:  College General Manager, ANU College of Law/Page Contact:  Law Marketing Team