Publications

This is a searchable catalogue of the College's most recent books, book chapters, journal articles and working papers. The ANU College of Law also publishes a Research Paper Series on SSRN.

Peer Review and the Global Anti-Corruption Conventions: Context, Theory and Practice

Peer Review and the Global Anti-Corruption Conventions: Context, Theory and Practice

Author(s): Kath Hall

This article analyses the international anti-corruption framework and the peer review monitoring process. Peer review is described as the “systematic examination and assessment of the performance of a state by other states, with the ultimate goal of helping the reviewed state … comply with established standards and principles.” However, despite its growing importance as a regulatory process, peer review has not been comprehensively analysed, resulting in a “literature famine” on its nature and operations. Indeed, to date, there has been very limited academic discussion on peer review. As a result, one aim of this article is to contribute to a stronger understanding of its process. While our focus is on peer review in the anti-corruption context, where possible, universal characteristics of the process are discussed. The second objective of this article is to consider the merits of the peer review process in incentivising states to take action against corruption. Peer review is the mechanism for evaluation of the United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC), the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) under its Anti-bribery Convention and the African Union’s (AU) good governance objectives under good governance objectives under the Peer Review Mechanism (APRM). Whilst acknowledging the criticisms of peer review, this article argues that peer review has been successful in particular contexts in increasing state compliance with these international instruments. In particular, peer review has contributed to the acceptance of anti-corruption norms and focused on the need for all countries to regulate corruption at the national level.

Read on SSRN

Centre: CCL, CIPL, LGDI

Research theme: Administrative Law, Legal Education, Private Law, Regulatory Law and Policy

Court records as Archives

Court Records As Archives: The Need for Law Reform to Ensure Access

Author(s): Andrew Henderson, Kim Rubenstein

The Federal Court of Australia performs a fundamentally important role within Australia’s democratic system. It has served as a site for the disputation, negotiation and resolution of issues fundamentally important to Australian society. It does so in the context of a constitutional system affirming the principle of separation of powers and the rule of law, as a means of preserving and enforcing the rights of individuals and navigating the boundaries of the powers of the state. In that context, its records, gathered both through the internal workings of the court and through the cases that come before it, contain a narrative shaping our contemporary understanding of the rights of the individual and the role of the state. Despite the importance of its records in that narrative, the preservation and access to the Federal Court’s records continues to be seen through the lens of traditional understandings of the management of litigation. This paper explores the Federal Court’s role within the broader context of constructing our understanding of the roles and responsibilities of citizenship and illustrates the importance of the Court’s records as an archival resource. In doing so, it highlights the parallels and inconsistencies between traditional archival institutions and the Court in relation to selection, preservation and access to records.

Read on SSRN

Centre: CIPL, CLAH

Research theme: Administrative Law, Constitutional Law and Theory, Human Rights Law and Policy, Law and Gender, Legal Education, Migration and Movement of Peoples

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ADJR at 40: In its Prime or a Disappointment to its Parents?

Author(s): Greg Weeks

The commencement of the ADJR Act represented a significant moment in Australian administrative law. This paper will discuss the impact of the ADJR Act and its continuing relevance.

Read on SSRN

Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law

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Planning and Soft Law

Author(s): Greg Weeks

Complex regulatory systems are particularly in need of regulation capable of maintaining both high standards and consistency in decision-making. Soft law is frequently the mechanism of choice to achieve these ends, since it can be made and altered with relative ease but is nonetheless treated as though it were hard and enforceable ‘law’. The law around environmental planning decisions, although subject to detailed legislative control, makes extensive and predominantly effective use of soft law. However, the use of soft law always carries some risk and this is generally imposed asymmetrically upon individuals rather than public bodies. This article will consider these issues, taking account of several relevant cases.

Read on SSRN

Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law

Government Accountability

Government Accountability As a ‘Constitutional Value’

Author(s): Greg Weeks

Accountability is frequently described as one of the key ‘values’ or ‘ideals’ that administrative law is designed to uphold. Accountability’s greatest claim to hold the status of a value might be its ubiquity: it has been described as the ‘buzzword of modern governance’, the ‘über-concept of the 21st century’, and a ‘theme … central to all discussion of government’. Yet the modern meaning of accountability has developed very recently. The word ‘accountability’ can be found in Australian cases over the last century but most refer to the accountability of fiduciaries (such as liquidators and executors) in equity, of taxpayers, of tortfeasors, in electoral matters and of public companies, rather than of government bodies. The concept of the ‘accountability’ of government to those governed has become prominent only fairly recently.

Read on SSRN

Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law

Judicial Review of Administrative Action

Judicial Review of Administrative Action and Government Liability 6th Edition

Author(s): Greg Weeks, Matthew Groves, Mark Aronson

Judicial Review of Administrative Action and Government Liability Sixth Edition is one of Australia’s most respected legal texts. It became the first title in our prestigious Lawbook Library Series, because it represents definitive legal scholarship and publishing excellence in Australian law. For two decades, this work has both mapped and supported development of the law and practice of judicial review of administrative action throughout Australia. Repeatedly cited in the High Court of Australia, this landmark work remains the definitive scholarly work for judicial officers, practitioners and students alike.

The sixth edition includes an entirely new chapter on what is now a substantial body of special statutory and common law rules that apply to government liability in contract, tort, and restitution. Numerous decisions of the High Court and the Federal Court, in particular, are producing a discernible relaxation of the traditional grounds of review, and a more expansive approach to the interpretation of regulatory statutes. In addition, the Full Court of the Federal Court has announced a simplification of the criteria for appeals limited to questions of law, overturning literally dozens of earlier precedents.

In the Sixth Edition, Mark Aronson and Matthew Groves are joined by Greg Weeks formerly from the University of New South Wales, and now at the Australian National University. Their combined expertise ensures that this pre-eminent title continues to provide a fresh and authoritative treatment of judicial review of administrative actions in Australia, and an invaluable guide to the special problems relating to government liability in tort, contract and equity.

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Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Regulatory Law and Policy

Crown and Sword

Crown and Sword: Executive power and the use of force by the Australian Defence Force

Author(s):

The Australian Defence Force, together with military forces from a number of western democracies, have for some years been seeking out and killing Islamic militants in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan, detaining asylum seekers for periods at sea or running the judicial systems of failed states. It has also been ready to conduct internal security operations at home. The domestic legal authority cited for this is often the poorly understood concept of executive power, which is power that derives from executive and not parliamentary authority. In an age of legality where parliamentary statutes govern action by public officials in the finest detail, it is striking that these extreme exercises of the use of force often rely upon an elusive legal basis. This book seeks to find the limits to the exercise of this extraordinary power.

Free download or order a printed copy

Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Constitutional Law and Theory, Regulatory Law and Policy

Delegated Legislation in Australia

Delegated Legislation in Australia, 5th edition

Editor(s): Dennis Pearce, Stephen Argument

Now in its fifth edition, Delegated Legislation in Australia provides updated and detailed coverage of all aspects of subordinate legislation, and is an essential reference for legislators, public officials at all levels of government, judicial officers and lawyers. It is the latest addition to the LexisNexis Black and Silver series.

Legislation made by various government and other bodies under the authority of an Act of Parliament far exceeds in volume the legislation made by Parliament in the form of statutes. Delegated Legislation in Australia includes a comprehensive overview of why and how delegated legislation is used to impose obligations on both citizens and business, and in what forms such legislation takes. Commentary is provided for each Australian jurisdiction as to the means used by Parliament to review the content of the legislation, and assess and compare the performance of each parliament.

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Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Regulatory Law and Policy

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The Foundations of Australian Public Law: State, Power, Accountability

Author(s): Anthony Connolly

In The Foundations of Australian Public Law, Anthony J. Connolly brings together the two traditionally discrete areas of constitutional and administrative law to present Australian public law as a single, integrated body. Exploring the themes of state, power and accountability in Australia, the text also makes reference to the law of international jurisdictions, where students are informed by contemporary public law theory. Particular attention is also given to the rise of global public law and the increasingly cosmopolitan nature of the subject in Australia. A comprehensive companion website complements the theory and discussion throughout the text and includes chapter summaries, further readings and discussion questions to encourage extended student learning. Written by a leader in the field, The Foundations of Australian Public Law is a key text for students looking to gain a comprehensive understanding of public law across Australia's federal, state and territory jurisdictions.

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Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law

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What Can We Legitimately Expect from the State?

Author(s): Greg Weeks

The recognition and enforcement of legitimate expectations by courts has been a striking feature of English law since R v North and East Devon Health Authority; ex parte Coughlan [2001] 3 QB 213. Although the substantive form of legitimate expectation adopted in Coughlan was quickly accepted by English courts and received a generally favourable response from public law scholars, the doctrine of that case has largely been rejected in other common law jurisdictions. The central principles of Coughlan have been rejected by courts in common law jurisdictions outside the UK for a range of reasons, such as incompatibility with local constitutional doctrine, or because they mark an undesirable drift towards merits review. The skeptical and critical reception to Coughlan outside England is a striking contrast to the reception the case received within the UK. This issue warrants the detailed scholarly analysis that it receives in this forthcoming book to be published by Hart.

This chapter considers the promises public authorities make to individuals and how they are received. It examines both the capacity of government to create expectations and the legitimacy of people entertaining firm expectations of government and considers the substantive enforcement of legitimate expectations, when government might be estopped from resiling from its representations and in what circumstances government may be liable for making negligent misrepresentations.

Read on SSRN

Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law

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Australian Constitutionalism and the UK-Style Dialogue Model of Human Rights Protection

Author(s): James Stellios

This paper considers the constitutional obstacles in Australia to the effective operation of a UK-style dialogue model of human rights protection. In Momcilovic v The Queen, the High Court of Australia relied upon separation of judicial power principles to frustrate the operation of dialogue models in Australia: whether enacted at the federal or State level. As a consequence, constitutionalism Australian-style – specifically, separation of powers implications – presents impenetrable obstacles to the effective operation of a UK-style dialogue model, and has locked in a limited role for the judiciary in the protection of rights.

Read on SSRN

Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Constitutional Law and Theory, International Law

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The Centralisation of Judicial Power within the Australian Federal System

Author(s): James Stellios

This article considers the patterns of centralisation within the federal judicial system. While centralisation of legislative, executive and fiscal power within the federal system has been well documented, the architecture of judicial federalism has been the subject of less attention. The article, first, seeks to show that principles derived from Chapter III of the Constitution have, on the whole, exhibited broadly similar centralising characteristics and exerted centralising effects, and, secondly, offers explanations for this centralisation.

Read on SSRN

Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Constitutional Law and Theory, International Law

Administrative decision making

Administrative Decision-Making in Australian Migration Law

Author(s):

The ANU College of Law, Migration Law Program is pleased to introduce a text in administrative decision-making in Australian migration law. Over the past eight years we have assembled a team of some of Australia’s most highly qualified migration agents and migration law specialists to deliver the Graduate Certificate in Australian Migration Law & Practice, and the Master of Laws in Migration Law. Through personal recollections and a comprehensive analysis of administrative decision-making, Alan Freckelton brings his professional expertise and experience in this complex field of law to the fore. The examination of High Court decisions, parliamentary speeches and public opinion bring a contentious area of law and policy to life, enabling the reader to consider the impact that legislation and decision-making has upon the individual and society as a whole.

Find online at ANU Press

Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Migration and Movement of Peoples

Laying Down the Law

Laying Down the Law

Author(s): Robin Creyke, Catriona Cook, Robert Stanley Geddes, David Hamer, Tristan S Taylor

Fully revised and expanded, this ninth edition of Laying Down the Law provides an invaluable introduction to the study of law. It includes clear and engaging explanations of essential foundation topics include Australia’s legal system and sources of law while discussion of current issues assists readers to understand the context in which our legal system operates. The comprehensive coverage of precedent and statutory interpretation provides a solid basis for legal study and practice, and the margin glossary identifies, explains and demystifies legal terms. Practical examples and exercises support learning and the development of key skills. New to this edition is a chapter on the legal profession and professional legal practice and ethics.

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Centre: CCL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Criminal Law, Private Law, Regulatory Law and Policy

Rehabilitiation and Compensation Act 1988

Annotated Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 (10th ed)

Author(s): , John Oman Ballard, Allan Anforth

The 10th edition of this well known reference book provides the full text of the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act as at 1 April 2014, together with comprehensive annotations, organised on a section-by-section basis, covering all significant decisions of the High Court, the Federal Court and the Administrative Appeals Tribunal on the Act. The book has up-to-date discussion of recent litigation concerning the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act, including "reasonable administrative action taken in a reasonable manner", liability for injuries in the course of employment, and construction of the approved Guide. It also includes a list of all legislative instruments published in the Gazette or entered in the Register of Legislative Instruments, and consideration of military compensation arrangements under the Act where the date of injury was before 1 July 2004. Canberra barrister Allan Anforth has contributed an expanded Practitioner's Guide aimed at claimants under the Act and their advocates.

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Centre: CCL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Regulatory Law and Policy

Tolley's International Taxation of Upstream Oil and Gas

Tolley's International Taxation of Upstream Oil and Gas

Author(s):

The scope of this title is to introduce and review significant international tax issues for upstream oil and gas operations. The book introduces and explains practical upstream tax issues, with an emphasis on tax risk management and related tax planning. Readers will develop skills in identifying tax exposures and opportunities, managing tax negotiations, and applying tax planning solutions and is intended to benefit accountants, lawyers, economists, financial managers and government officials. The book aims to be the first choice for the new starter in upstream oil and gas taxation. It also aims to be the best introduction of international tax issues relating to upstream oil and gas, enabling the reader to analyse and understand new situations and circumstances, rather than an encyclopaedic reference of tax issues.

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Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Environmental Law, International Law

Statutory Interpretations in Australia

Statutory Interpretation in Australia

Author(s): Dennis Pearce, Robert Stanley Geddes

Forty years since the first edition was published and eight editions later, Statutory Interpretation in Australia remains the pre-eminent text on the subject. Statutory Interpretation in Australia, 8th Edition concentrates on: statements of the courts and tribunals – describing approaches, assumptions and techniques of interpretation, as well as the application of these in one’s work; and the Interpretation Acts of each of the Australian jurisdictions - understanding the content of which is essential to determining the meaning of legislation. Extensive case references to the relevant principles for each jurisdiction have been included, allowing readers to identify the authorities that best suit their particular purposes.

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Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law

The Public Law of Restitution

Author(s): Greg Weeks

Restitution as the response to unjust enrichment has been available for a long time. As a body of law, it has mainly related to transactions between private entities. The decision of the House of Lords in Woolwich Equitable Building Society v Inland Revenue Commissioners [1993] AC 70 changed the law of restitution as it had developed in the UK up to that point. It did this by holding that an unlawful demand for a payment of tax which was not due was an unjust factor capable of making out unjust enrichment and enabling the claimant to obtain restitution of the money paid and interest. This government-only unjust factor operates in a fashion which is distinct from unjust factors which focus on the intention of the claimant to transfer wealth. Instead it asks whether the transfer of money was consequent on an unlawful demand. Woolwich has not as yet been adopted in Australia, but this article argues that it should be, albeit not as a direct constitutional claim. It further discusses the importance of Woolwich as a basis for restitution consequent on the use of soft law, which is a pervasive and highly effective means of regulation which otherwise results in almost no legal consequences.

Read on SSRN

Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Administrative Law

Tolley's International Taxation of Corporaet Finance

Tolley's International Taxation of Corporate Finance

Author(s):

This book introduces and discusses international tax issues relating to corporate finance, group treasury, and banking operations. The book is intended to benefit accountants, lawyers, economists, financial managers and government officials by explaining practical corporate finance international tax issues. These issues include: examples of country tax regimes; corporate finance including issuing shares; debt instruments; bank loans; investment banking activities; and alternative finance such as crowdfunding; microfinance and alternative energy funding; and international tax issues relating to interest and dividend flows; capital gains; and foreign tax credits. The book reviews related topics, including: mergers and acquisitions funding; asset and project finance; securitisation; derivatives; hybrid securities and entities; Islamic financing; bank capital structures; group treasury companies; debt restructuring; and transfer pricing issues. The book is based on Corporate Finance and International Taxation courses presented by the author in London, Paris, Zurich, Lugano, Rio de Janeiro, Mexico City, Hong Kong and Singapore.

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Centre: CCL

Research theme: Administrative Law, Regulatory Law and Policy

Cane, Atiyah

Atiyah's Accidents, Compensation and the Law (8th ed)

Author(s): Peter Cane

Since publication of the seventh edition of this seminal text, personal injury law has witnessed momentous changes. A major overhaul of the social security system began in 2012 and the Equality Act 2010 significantly modifies anti-discrimination law and its impact on the disabled. But perhaps the most important legal developments have affected the financing and conduct of personal injury claiming and the operation of the claims-management industry. This new edition takes account of all this activity while setting it into a wider and longer perspective. Complaints that Britain is a 'compensation culture' and that the tort system is out of control are explained and assessed and options for further change are explored. Through the turmoil and controversy, the tort system remains a central feature of the legal and social landscape. The book's enduring central argument for its radical reform remains as compelling as ever.

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Centre: CCL

Research theme: Administrative Law

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