Regulatory Law and Policy

PhD Candidate
Research interests:
Environmental Law
Sub-Dean, Graduate Certificate Migration Law
Research interests:
Administrative law, Migration and movement of peoples, Migration Law, Labour Law, Immigration
Associate Professor
Research interests:
Regulation of Corporate Responsibility, Business and Human Rights, Torts, Counter-Terrorism Law, Rule of Law Reform
Associate Professor
Research interests:
Corporations & Financial Markets Law, Rule of Law Reform, Legal Ethics
Senior Lecturer
Research interests:
Access to Justice, Historical Injustice, Indigenous Perspectives on Law, Legal empowerment, Rural Issues, Law and development, Social justice, Advocacy, Lawyers and lawyering, Experiential Learning
PhD Candidate
Research interests:
Regulatory theory and practice, Penology and human rights, Asian Law, Plain legal language
Lecturer
Research interests:
Regulation within the Australian Financial System, Ethics and Supervised Legal Practice, Commercial Law
Lecturer
Research interests:
Legal Structures for Environmental and Climate Risk and Impact Management, Facilitation of Energy and Technological Change through the Law, Environmental Law, Climate Change and Natural Disasters, energy law, electricity law, Competition Law, Climate change
Senior Lecturer
Research interests:
Labour Law, Work Health & Safety law, Commonwealth Public Sector Employment law
Professor
Research interests:
Corporations & Financial Markets Law, Evidence and Procedure
Senior Lecturer
Research interests:
Access to Government Information, Administrative law, Public law, Privacy
Lecturer
Research interests:
Wellbeing, Legal Ethics, Therapeutic Jurisprudence, Empirical Legal Research, Behavioural Legal Ethics, Mental Health, Human Rights and the Law, Trauma-informed Lawyering
Lecturer
Research interests:
Access to Justice and Legal Empowerment of the Poor, Law reform, Law and justice monitoring and evaluation, Law and development, Health Justice Partnerships
PhD Candidate
Research interests:
Access to Justice and Legal Empowerment of the Poor, Access to Government Information, Citizenship, Torts, Medical Law, No-fault compensation, Competition Law, Consumer law, Mental Health law, Disability law, Environmental Law

Latest news

09
Jun
2017
Fishing trawler
Anti-slavery legislation is a good start, but if we want a future where goods are produced free of slavery it requires government, business and consumers to all be pulling in the same direction, Jolyon Ford writes.
08
Feb
2017
Blurred Crowd
How might the Trump era affect trends in responsible business (and its regulation)? Associate Professor Jolyon Ford' returns to his blog Private Sector - Public World for the first post of 2017.
19
Dec
2016
Heather Cork
Heather Cork was awarded a Summer Research Scholarship exploring whistle-blowing in the private sector before beginning her Honours semester at the ANU College of Law.
08
Jul
2016
Rani John
The practical and policy issues that arise when government corporate regulators move to litigate will be explored by a key speaker at an ANU College of Law and Commercial Law Association Conference.
07
Apr
2016
The National Law Reform Conference will bring together some of Australia's best legal practitioners, policy experts, researchers and academics.

In the Media

06
Dec
2016

David and Goliath battle over "Radio Adelaide" name

Brett Walker speaks to ABC Radio National

Research theme:

Upcoming events

08
Sep
2017

40th Anniversary of the Federal Court of Australia

Event image
9.00AM to 1.00PM

The ANU Centre for Commercial Law and Centre for International and Public Law are proud to announce a conference to mark the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the Federal Court of Australia. 

Past events

No past events found.

26
Jul
2016
Author(s): Ron Levy, Graeme Orr, University of Queensland.

The quantity and quality of political opinion polling are sources of concern for electoral democracies worldwide. A significant number of countries regulate polling by embargoing publication in the latter stages of the election period, or by mandating disclosure of key information about each poll. Such regulation, however, is rare in common law systems, where ‘free speech’ arguments tend to hold sway, sublimating concern for the deliberative health of political discourse. This article examines the issue, comparing regulation and case law internationally in light of the evolution, benefits and pathologies of opinion polling. A distinction can be made between polling on issues, which permit us all to reflect on the positions of fellow citizens on substantive issues, and the almost endless stream of polling on voting intentions, which offers little from a deliberative perspective. We recommend regulation to ensure disclosure, at the point of publication, of key information about each opinion poll (eg who conducted it, the wording of questions and margins of error), as well as a campaign-period embargo on publishing electoral opinion polling.

Centre: DGAL
04
Jan
2016
Author(s): Kath Hall, Milton C Regan Jr, Georgetown University

This paper examines the growth of transnational governance, and what it means for business lawyers advising multinational corporate clients. The term “governance” incorporates the network of actors, instruments and mechanisms that now govern transnational corporations, separate from the nation state. It is reasonable to expect that lawyers play an important role in advising business clients on how to effectively operate within this system. Indeed, many transnational legal instruments are intended to enhance clients’ business goals by enabling them to engage more efficiently in cross-border commerce. Other forms of regulation, such as human rights regulation, purports to impose requirements on companies that go beyond what is necessary to enhance cross-border commerce. 

In this paper we discuss the transnational governance regime that has arisen to address the adverse human rights impacts of business activities. We focus in particular on the United Nations (UN) Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, which were adopted by the UN Human Rights Council in 2011. We ask what if any role is there for lawyers in fostering acknowledgment and fulfilment of these responsibilities among clients? Is the duty to respect human rights a “legal” obligation in any sense? If a lawyer does provide advice, should it encompass only legal risks to the company that fall within the lawyer’s traditionally defined specialized expertise? Or should it go beyond that to include other concerns?

Centre: CIPL

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