Private Law

Lecturer
Research interests:
Labour Law, Law of Obligations
Associate Professor
Research interests:
Competition Law, Consumer Protection Law, Animal Law, Law and Religion
Emeritus Professor
Research interests:
Law of Obligations, Philosophies of Law, Comparative administrative law, Torts, Concepts of responsibility
Adjunct Professor
Research interests:
Family law
Emeritus Professor
Research interests:
Law of Obligations, Private International Law, Torts, Contracts, Commercial Law
Associate Professor
Research interests:
Regulation of Corporate Responsibility, Business and Human Rights, Torts, Counter-Terrorism Law, Rule of Law Reform
Associate Professor
Research interests:
Corporations & Financial Markets Law, Rule of Law Reform, Legal Ethics
Senior Lecturer
Research interests:
Trusts, Civil Remedies, Private Law Theory, Adjudication Theory
Senior Lecturer
Research interests:
Employment law, Labour Law, Summary dismissal of employees, Employee misconduct, Termination of employment contracts, Climate change policy, Workplace law, Contract of employment, Industrial law
Adjunct Professor
Research interests:
Civil litigation
Adjunct Professor
Research interests:
Public law, Commercial Law, National security
Associate Professor
Research interests:
Law of Obligations, Property Law, Corporations & Financial Markets Law, Regulation of religious financing;
Senior Lecturer
Research interests:
Constitutional Courts, Constitutional History, Constitutional Rights, Gender and Constitutional Law, The Judicial System, Property Law
PhD Candidate
Research interests:
Administrative law, Torts, private law remedies, Accountability, Government liability
Senior Lecturer
Research interests:
Labour Law, Work Health & Safety law, Commonwealth Public Sector Employment law
Adjunct Professor
Research interests:
Law of Obligations
Professor
Research interests:
Corporations & Financial Markets Law, Evidence and Procedure
Emeritus Professor
Research interests:
Law of Obligations
Associate Lecturer
Research interests:
Law of Obligations, Corporations & Financial Markets Law
Senior Lecturer
Research interests:
Contracts, Intellectual Property Law, Freedom of speech
Lecturer
Research interests:
Intellectual Property Law, Commercial Law, Clinical Legal Education

Latest news

09
Mar
2017
Technology transfer

Investing in early stage start ups or ventures is inherently risky with a recent Stanford University Report finding that 92% of technology start ups failed within 3 years. How the risk of failure or under performance is shared by, or transferred between, promoters and investors is something that technology transfer lawyers spend a lot of time working on, both in the drafting and negotiation phases of a transaction. A recent decision of the NSW Supreme Court demonstrates what can go wrong.

08
Mar
2017
Women in meeting

Law is by no means a male-dominated degree, but beyond graduation, certain fields of the profession see their female lawyers fall away. Why?

27
Feb
2017
Ellie Greenwood and Andreas Sherborne

Ellie Greenwood and Andreas Sherborne are the shared recipients of the Blackburn Medal for Research in Law.

27
Feb
2017
Naomi Wootton

Naomi Wootton has always been a driven student, receiving two academic scholarships – the ANU Region Scholarship and the Ethel Tory Scholarship – and the University Medal in 2016. Now she has been awarded six more prizes.

08
Feb
2017
Blurred Crowd

How might the Trump era affect trends in responsible business (and its regulation)? Associate Professor Jolyon Ford' returns to his blog Private Sector - Public World for the first post of 2017.

In the Media

01
May
2017

Grace under fire - a film about rural women workers

Skye Saunders talks to Law Institute of Victoria Journal

08
Nov
2016

Despite business’ best efforts whistleblowers still lack protection under Australian law: new research

Professor A J Brown (ANU Law alumnus - GDLP '97) writes in The Conversation

Research theme:
22
Oct
2016

Business for Peace: Who profits in the long run?

Jolyon Ford interviewed by ABC 666 Breakfast

Research theme:

Upcoming events

29
Jun
2017

25th ANZSIL Conference: 'Sustaining the international legal order in an era of rising nationalism'

ANZSIL event image
9.00AM to 1.00PM
  • A/Prof Balakrishnan Rajagopal
  • Prof Kerrie Sadiq
  • Prof Natasha Affolder
  • Prof Tim McCormack

The ANU College of Law and the Centre for International and Public Law are very proud to support the 25th ANZSIL Conference: Sustaining the International Legal Order in an Era of Rising Nationalism. 

Past events

No past events found.

01
Mar
2016
Author(s):

This article considers fragmented property systems – the phenomenon of contested, separated or overlapping sub-systems within a national property jurisdiction. One example is circumstances of property despite law. Globally, as many as a billion people claim de facto property without recognition by law in urban informal settlements and agro-pastoral or forested areas. Another example is property without transition to law. Many households in the developing world regulate land markets through local mechanisms notwithstanding opportunities or requirements to use law.

The article provides a conceptual frame for the emergence of property system fragmentation based on the private coordination of property relations. The article argues that fragmentation emerges in complex property systems where law attempts to displace property coordination mechanisms, but fails to induce a critical mass of property participants to alter coordination strategies. A focus on coordination provides a means to combine the methodological individualism of economic narratives with collective variables highlighted by other perspectives on property such as anthropology and complex systems theory.

Centre: CCL
Research theme: Private Law
04
Jan
2016
Author(s): Kath Hall, Milton C Regan Jr, Georgetown University

This paper examines the growth of transnational governance, and what it means for business lawyers advising multinational corporate clients. The term “governance” incorporates the network of actors, instruments and mechanisms that now govern transnational corporations, separate from the nation state. It is reasonable to expect that lawyers play an important role in advising business clients on how to effectively operate within this system. Indeed, many transnational legal instruments are intended to enhance clients’ business goals by enabling them to engage more efficiently in cross-border commerce. Other forms of regulation, such as human rights regulation, purports to impose requirements on companies that go beyond what is necessary to enhance cross-border commerce. 

In this paper we discuss the transnational governance regime that has arisen to address the adverse human rights impacts of business activities. We focus in particular on the United Nations (UN) Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, which were adopted by the UN Human Rights Council in 2011. We ask what if any role is there for lawyers in fostering acknowledgment and fulfilment of these responsibilities among clients? Is the duty to respect human rights a “legal” obligation in any sense? If a lawyer does provide advice, should it encompass only legal risks to the company that fall within the lawyer’s traditionally defined specialized expertise? Or should it go beyond that to include other concerns?

Centre: CIPL

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