Publications

This is a searchable catalogue of the College's most recent books and working papers. Other papers and publications can be found on SSRN and the ANU Researchers database.

 Alternative Law Journal

Indigenous corporations: Lessons from Māori business forms

Author(s): Akshaya Kamalnath

The economic and political empowerment of Indigenous people are linked although the issue of economic empowerment is often overlooked. This Brief analyses the corporate governance model and business structures used by Māori in New Zealand along with some developments in Canadian Indigenous businesses. Based on this, the Brief makes suggestions for proving the regulatory support and options available for Indigenous businesses in Australia.

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Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Indigenous Peoples and the Law

The Journal of Corporate Law Studies

Transnational corporations and modern slavery: Nevsun and beyond

Author(s): Akshaya Kamalnath

A recent decision of the Supreme Court of Canada Nevsun Resources Ltd. v Araya, has brought the issue of transnational corporations’ responsibility for human rights violations to the forefront in Canada. After critically examining the decision, this article aims to propose an effective legislative design for Canada. The article also examines another pertinent decision (this one from the UK), Vedanta Resources plc. v Lungowe in this regard. The proposals for effective legislation in Canada set out in this article will also be relevant for other countries considering the introduction of (or amending) modern slavery laws.

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Centre: CIPL

Research theme: Human Rights Law and Policy, International Law

Social Enterprise and Equity Crowdfunding – Exploiting Synergies

Social Enterprise and Equity Crowdfunding – Exploiting Synergies

Author(s): Akshaya Kamalnath

Australia introduced equity crowdfunding as a mode of financing in 2017. At the beginning of 2020, there are indications that a legal regime for social enterprises will be considered. The social enterprise movement shares some goals and ethos with the equity crowdfunding movement. This article will outline these shared goals and ethos, and argue that because of these shared goals and ethos, the legal regimes for both should be able to share infrastructure to ensure that both industries are able to develop.

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Centre: CLAH

Research theme: Law and Social Justice

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