Law, Governance & Development Initiative

Law Governance and Development hero image

The Law, Governance and Development Initiative brings together experts from the ANU College of Law and the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific to identify, research and analyse the relationship between law, governance and development in developing countries across the Asia-Pacific region, Africa and the Middle East.

Last updated date

1.57pm Monday 16 April 2018

Recently

25
May
2016
Visit to Yangon University, Myanmar to teach HDR research skills

Mark Nolan visited Yangon University in Myanmar as part of a project run by the Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, designed to teach HDR research and supervision skills. Mark is also an active member of the ANU Myanmar Research Centre.

Latest news

26
Jun
2020
Dr Bal Kama
From the remote highlands of Papua New Guinea to the heights of legal academia, Dr Bal Kama's scholarly success has been shaped by his determination to overcome challenges and deep commitment to the Pacific.
24
Aug
2018
Bal Kama standing in front of a wattle tree
Researching relationship between PNG's judiciary and parliament
15
Jun
2018
Carol Lawson, PhD candidate, ANU College of Law
Carol Lawson's research compares data between ACT and Japanese prisons
05
Dec
2017
Alice Dawkins
ANU Honours student Alice Dawkins has been selected from over 4,000 applicants worldwide as a Schwarzman Scholar for 2018/2019.
24
Oct
2017
Two people shacking hands in corporate setting
Inadequate whistleblower laws have come under scrutiny in a new book which urges sweeping law reform for Australia in a wide range of areas.

In the Media

Upcoming events

No upcoming events found.

Past events

15
May
2019

From coups to crises: where next for Thailand?

Thailand election
5.30PM to 7.00PM
  • Thitinan Pongsudhirak

Join leading Thai political scientist Professor Thitinan Pongsudhirak, The Australian National University (ANU) Thai consitutional law expert Sarah Bishop and Director of Lowy Institute’s Southeast Asia Project Ben Bland for a discussion on what happens next in one of Southeast Asia’s most volatile nations.

08-12
May
2017

Wellbeing in the Law Week - Mon 8 to Fri 12 May

Wellbeing week
12.00PM to 5.00PM

The ANU College of Law is committed to health and wellbeing in the law, for all our students and academic and professional staff. This is the inaugural Wellbeing in the Law Week, presented by the ANU College of Law Wellbeing Initiative and the ANU Law Students' Society.

‘Good governance’, ‘rule of law’, ‘access to justice’ and ‘structural reforms’ remain high on the agenda of international development and aid agencies, governments, local non-governmental organisations and civil society activists in developing, post-conflict and transitional States.

Within this context, and leveraging the unique regional position and perspective of the ANU, the Law, Governance and Development Initiative at ANU examines the role of law in promoting social and economic development, and offers a critical analysis of the reform agenda and its theoretical foundations.

Through the initiative, academics and students explore the role that local, national and international systems of law and governance play in fostering social, economic and political change.

In addition to considering historical shifts and current trends – including those being seen in Asia and the Pacific – the initiative, and the LGD stream in our Master of Laws program introduce students to a range of theoretical tools, and strengthens their ability to think critically and creatively about the links between law, governance and development.

 

Directors


Moeen Cheema
Associate Professor

Rebecca Monson
Associate Professor

Members


Jolyon Ford
Professor

Kath Hall
Honorary Associate Professor

Mark Nolan
Honorary Professor

Higher degree research students


Sarah Bishop
PhD Candidate

Caroline Compton
PhD Candidate

David Healey
SJD Candidate

Carol Lawson
PhD Candidate

Affiliates

Miranda Forsythe
Associate Professor
Regnet School of Regulation and Global Governance, ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia
John Braithwaite
Distinguished Professor
Regnet School of Regulation and Global Governance, ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia
Sinclair Dinnen
Associate Professor and School Deputy Director (Research)
Coral Bell School of Asia-Pacific Affairs ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia
Professor William Maley
Professor of Diplomacy
Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia
Ms Siobhan McDonnell
Post-Graduate
Pacific Institute College of Asia and the Pacific
The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia
Veronica Taylor
Professor
Regnet School of Regulation and Global Governance, ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia

Advisory board

Lecturer
ANU College of Law
The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia
Rebecca Monson
Lecturer
ANU College of Law
The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia
Associate Professor Jolyon Ford
Associate Professor
ANU College of Law
The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia
Associate Professor Kath Hall
Associate Professor
ANU College of Law
The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia
Professor
Monash University
Canberra, Australia
Sinclair Dinnen
Senior Fellow
State, Society & Governance in Melanesia Program (SSGM), School of International, Political & Strategic Studies, ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia
Veronica Taylor
Dean
ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia

The Law, Governance and Development Initiative conducts its research projects under a number of Clusters. These Clusters and projects, as well as those involved in their delivery are outlined below.

Students at The Australian National University can explore issues of law, governance and development through several postgraduate programs.

ANU College of Law

The Law, Governance and Development Masters specialisation offered by the ANU College of Law considers the role of law in a development context. It examines international and national legal perspectives on issues of governance and development and includes a focus on current case studies in the Asia Pacific region.   This specialisation is available at the Graduate Diploma and Masters level, and to both law and non-law graduates. 

ANU College of Asia and the Pacific

The Master of Applied Anthropology & Participatory Development provides students an understanding of the principal ways in which critical social inquiry and participatory processes can be applied to the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of development activities and is designed for those who have developed an interest in the application of anthropology's critical methods and styles to social issues in development.

The Master of Diplomatic Studies focuses on the theory and practice of modern diplomacy, and is ideal for those whose professional role might involve a solid understanding of transnational diplomacy, and its contemporary challenges, whether this be with a civil service department, multilateral body, international corporation or non-government organization.

Higher Degree Research opportunities

There are a range of research opportunities with the law, governance and development initiative as we seek to expand the research being undertaken into law and development related fields. Interested students are currently undertaking research through a Doctor of Philosophy or Master of Philosophy with either the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific or the ANU College of Law or a Doctor of Juridical Science with the ANU College of Law.

Moeen Cheema

Moeen's thesis aims to present a contextualized history of the law in postcolonial Pakistan and situate the judicial review jurisprudence of the superior courts, in particular their recent activism and consequential populism, in the contexts of the historical developments of constitutional politics, evolution of state structures and broader social transformations.  It will show how in each epoch of the post-colonial state’s history the superior courts positioned themselves within the state and vis a vis the demands that different segments of the society placed upon the state and its institutions. It will bring forth evidence demonstrating that the courts did not define their role in accordance with certain abstract theories of constitutionalism, rule of law and separation of powers that had been deeply imbricated in the post-colonial state’s self-justifications. Rather, these courts re-situated themselves from time to time and re-fashioned their role in accordance with the perceived demands of fundamental shifts in constitutional politics, state structure and state-society dialectics. In the process, these courts re-cast the theoretical conceptualizations of constitutionalism, rule of law, and separation of powers to better reflect their evolving role and jurisprudence. This thesis will thus present a case-study of how the superior courts in Pakistan have articulated the theoretical frameworks legitimizing their role in accordance with the contexts of state and society. A deeper understanding of these phenomena – i.e. the evolution of judicial role in response to shifts in socio-political context, and the re-crafting of theoretical frameworks to justify it – will enable us to meaningfully scrutinize the courts’ recent jurisprudence and evaluate the judiciary’s new role in Pakistan’s governance scheme. As such, it will be argued that the courts’ role is deeply political in terms of defining the nature and relevant powers of state institutions and the imperatives for their actions. 

Moeen is working with Peter Cane and Leighton McDonald.

Joe Foukona

In 2008, Joe came over to Canberra on State Society and Governance in Melanesia Pacific Visitor Program and this inspired him to apply for a doctoral scholarship through AusAID’s Australian Leadership Award. He currently holds a Bachelor of Laws and a Master of Laws from University of the South Pacific (USP), and a further Master of Laws from Victoria University (Wellington), Joe is also an experienced teacher, lecturing at USP’s Emalus Campus in Port Vila since 2004.

Joe’s research focus matches closely his keen personal interest in finding solutions to the seemingly intractable problem of the alignment in Melanesia between customary land tenure systems on one hand and state legislation, land administration and commercial demands on the other. He has been very active as a facilitator of land awareness programs in his own home community on Malaita, Solomon Islands, and working with the Solomon Islands Law Reform Commission on low and high water mark legislation. Joe now plans to look in some detail at the history of land reform programs in three Melanesian countries: Vanuatu, Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. Why have these programs been so unsuccessful, both in the colonial era and since independence in all three countries? Might we reach a better understanding of the terms for success by better understanding these histories of failure?

Joe is working with Chris Ballard, Daniel Fitzpatrick and Rebecca Monson.

Academic supervisors and their research interests

Staff are available to supervise research in the following areas:

  • Access to justice and legal empowerment of the poor
  • State fragility and armed conflicts
  • International law
  • Environmental law, climate change and natural disasters
  • Rule of law reform

Access to justice and legal empowerment of the poor

State fragility

 International law

  • Don Rothwell: Law of the sea, international law and use of armed force

Environmental law, climate change and natural disasters

  • Matthew Zagor: Environmental law and policy
  • Rebecca Monson: Human rights and vulnerability to natural disaster, property rights after disaster

Rule of law

  • Veronica Taylor: Professional standards in law and development
  • William Maley: Rule of law reform; migration and human rights law.
  • Kath Hall: Corruption and corporate governance
  • Mark Nolan: Jury reform in Japan, comparative law (Asia, especially Thailand), legal and social psychological theories of justice and human rights
  • George Barker: Law and economics

 

Activities archive

25
May
2016
Visit to Yangon University, Myanmar to teach HDR research skills

Mark Nolan visited Yangon University in Myanmar as part of a project run by the Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, designed to teach HDR research and supervision skills. Mark is also an active member of the ANU Myanmar Research Centre.

Updated:  10 August 2015/Responsible Officer:  College General Manager, ANU College of Law/Page Contact:  Law Marketing Team