Dr Anthony Hopkins

Senior Lecturer
BA (UOW) LLB (QUT)(Hons) PhD (Canberra); Barrister (ACT)
+61 2 6125 4066
Room 121

home icon ANU College of Law, Bld 5, Fellows Rd, Acton ACT 2601

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Research interests

Biography

Dr Anthony Hopkins is a Senior Lecturer at the ANU College of Law, having been appointed in 2014. Anthony began his career as a criminal defence lawyer in Alice Springs at the Central Australian Aboriginal Legal Aid Service. After taking time off to raise his children, Anthony returned to the law as a lecturer at the University of Canberra in 2008. There he taught Criminal Law, Evidence Law, Advocacy and Indigenous Australians and the Law, receiving awards for his innovative teaching approaches designed to take students as close as possible to the coalface of practice.

Anthony was called to the bar in 2010, joining Burley Griffin Chambers in the ACT. He continues to practice as a barrister with a focus on sentencing and appellate criminal cases.

Anthony represents the Bar Association and the ANU College of Law on the ACT Justice Reform Strategy Advisory Group, focusing on innovations in sentencing and corrections designed to reduce incarceration rates. He has a personal and professional commitment to approaches to rehabilitation and personal change, born, in part, from his continuing Vipassana meditation practise.

Appointments

Professional Associate University of Canberra

Significant research publications

  • Charlotte King, Lorana Bartels, Patricia Easteal and Anthony Hopkins, ‘Did Defensive Homicide in Victoria provide a safety net for Battered Women Who Kill? A case study analysis’ (2016) 42(1) Monash University Law Review 138.

 

  • David Hoitink and Anthony Hopkins, 'Divergent approaches to the admissibility of tendency evidence in New South Wales and Victoria: The risk of adopting a more permissive approach’ (2015) 39 Crim LJ 303.

 

  • Thalia Anthony, Lorana Bartels and Anthony Hopkins, ‘Lessons Lost in Sentencing: Welding Individualised Justice to Indigenous Justice’ (2015) 39(1) Melbourne University Law Review 47.

 

  • Christina Lewis, Anthony Hopkins and Lorana Bartels, ‘The Relevance of Aboriginality in Sentencing: Findings from Interviews in the ACT’ in Patricia Easteal (ed) Justice Connections (Cambridge Scholars, 2013) 37.

 

  • Anthony Hopkins, ‘The Relevance of Aboriginality in Sentencing: Sentencing a Person for Who they Are,’ (2012) 16(1) Australian Indigenous Law Review 37.

Recent news

17
May
2017
Addicted to jail

A leading law academic from The Australian National University (ANU) has warned that Australia’s criminal justice system is addicted to incarceration, describing the rate of imprisonment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as a catastrophe.

05
May
2017
Absrtact picture of birds flying out of a prison wall

ANU Law Explains is a National Law Week 2017 event which will examine four highly political issues with a legal perspective for a layperson audience.

16
Feb
2017
Officials from ACT Supreme Court, ANU College of Law and UC School of Law and Justice

The ACT Bar Association has entered into a partnership that aims to give Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) law students greater opportunities to work with the Courts and senior members of the ACT legal profession.

In the Media

26
May
2017
Anthony Hopkins speaks to ABC Radio Overnights
17
Oct
2016
Anthony Hopkins interviewed by 2XX

Upcoming events

01
Jun
2017
National reconciliation week
12.30PM to 2.00PM
Panel discussion

The Centre for International and Public Law is proud to host a panel discussion during National Reconciliation Week. Each panel member will speak on an aspect of their research that affects Indigenous communities.

Past events

17
May
2017
Event image
10.00AM to 7.00PM
Panel discussion

Learn about the legal issues impacting counter-terrorism, citizenship, race relations, climbing imprisonment rates and the South China Sea.

Please note, only a small selection of recent publications and activities are listed below.

Research biography

Dr Anthony Hopkins undertakes research with a focus on the denial of equality before the law in the criminal justice system. Drawing upon his past experience working for the Aboriginal Legal Service in Alice Springs and his continuing experience as a barrister in the ACT, his publications are primarily targeted at illuminating the lived experience of those who come before the law.

In 2015, Anthony completed his PhD by publication, which included articles and book chapters considering national and international reforms with respect to sentencing Indigenous Australians, criminal defences for battered women who kill in response to family violence and limits on the cross-examination of vulnerable witnesses.

He is co-author (with John Anderson) of a student-oriented text on Uniform Evidence Law, which incorporates his innovative experiential approach to teaching evidence law. This approach, also the subject of an earlier publication, takes students to the coalface of practice, enabling them to understand practical operation of the law and its impact.

Anthony represents the Bar Association and the ANU College of Law on the ACT Justice Reform Strategy Advisory Group, focusing on innovations in sentencing and corrections designed to reduce incarceration rates.

Books & edited collections

  • John Anderson and Anthony Hopkins, Uniform Evidence Law Guidebook (Oxford University Press, 2014).

Book chapters

 

  • Christina Lewis, Anthony Hopkins and Lorana Bartels, ‘The Relevance of Aboriginality in Sentencing: Findings from Interviews in the ACT’ in Patricia Easteal (ed) Justice Connections (Cambridge Scholars, 2013) 37.

 

  • Patricia Easteal and Anthony Hopkins, Chapter 7 ‘Women and Criminal Defences to Homicide’ in Patricia Easteal (ed) Women and the Law (LexisNexis, 2010).

 

Refereed journal articles

  • Charlotte King, Lorana Bartels, Patricia Easteal and Anthony Hopkins, ‘Did Defensive Homicide in Victoria provide a safety net for Battered Women Who Kill? A case study analysis’ (2016) 42(1) Monash University Law Review 138.

 

  • David Hoitink and Anthony Hopkins, 'Divergent approaches to the admissibility of tendency evidence in New South Wales and Victoria: The risk of adopting a more permissive approach’ (2015) 39 Crim LJ 303.

 

  • Thalia Anthony, Lorana Bartels and Anthony Hopkins, ‘Lessons Lost in Sentencing: Welding Individualised Justice to Indigenous Justice’ (2015) 39(1) Melbourne University Law Review 47.

 

  • Anthony Hopkins, ‘The Relevance of Aboriginality in Sentencing: Sentencing a Person for Who they Are,’ (2012) 16(1) Australian Indigenous Law Review 37.

 

  • Anthony Hopkins and Patricia Easteal, ‘Walking in Her Shoes: Battered Women Who Kill in Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia’  (2010) 35(3) Alternative Law Journal 132.

 

  • Russell Boyd and Anthony Hopkins, ‘Cross-examination of Child Sexual Assault Complainants: Concerns About the Application of s 41 Evidence Act,’ (2010) 34 Criminal Law Journal 149.

 

  • Anthony Hopkins, ‘Teaching Evidence Law within the Framework of a Trial: Relating Theory to Practice as Students Take to Their Feet and Take Responsibility for the Trial Narrative’ (2009) 2(1&2) Journal of the Australasian Law Teachers Association 173.

Conference papers & presentations

 

  • Anthony Hopkins, ‘Meeting the Challenge of Bugmy: Using Gladue-style Reports to Link the Story of the People to the Story of the Person’ (Presented at National Indigenous Legal Conference 2016, Australian National University, 6 September 2016).

 

  • Anthony Hopkins, ‘Compassion as a Foundation for Giving Equal Consideration in Criminal Justice Law Reform’ (Presented at National Law Reform Conference, Australian National University, 14 April 2016).
  • Anthony Hopkins, Lisa Oxman, Lorana Bartells, ‘Justice as Wellbeing in Prison: The Potential of Vipassana Meditation’ (Presented at Justice Connections IV Symposium, Australian National University, 20 November 2015).

  • Lorana Bartels, Thalia Anthony and Anthony Hopkins, ‘Sentencing Aboriginal offenders in Australia and Canada: A comparative analysis’ (Presented at the International Society for the Reform of Criminal Law Conference on Sentencing and Corrections, Vancouver, June 2014).

  • Anthony Hopkins and Christina Muthurajah,Controlling Leading Questions in the Cross-Examination of Aboriginal Witnesses: The Legal Position in Practice in Alice Springs’ (Presented to combined conference of the Applied Linguistics Association of Australia, Applied Linguistics Association of New Zealand and Australian Linguistic Society, Australian National University, 1-2 December 2011).

  • Anthony Hopkins, ‘Aboriginality in Sentencing – Sentencing a Person for Who They Are’ (Presented at the Fifth National Indigenous Legal Conference, Australian National University, 1-2 October 2010).

 

Government submissions

  • Anthony Hopkins, Submission No 9 to Australian Capital Territory Legislative Standing Committee, Inquiry into Sentencing, 14 October 2013.

 

  • Patricia Easteal and Anthony Hopkins, Submission No 36 to Australian Law Reform Commission, Family Violence and Commonwealth Laws, 12 May 2010.

Committees

External Organisations

  • ACT Department of Justice and Community Safety, Justice Reform Strategy Advisory Group.

ANU Internal Committees

  • Appeals Committe (Academic Misconduct)
  • LLBHons Program Committee
  • Exams Committee

 

 

Research interests

PhD supervision

I am willing to supervise in the areas:

  • Criminal Law and Justice
  • Sentencing
  • Indigenous peoples and the Criminal Law
  • Evidence Law

 

LLM Masters thesis supervision

 

 

Honours thesis supervision

I am willing to supervise in the areas:

  • Criminal Law and Justice
  • Sentencing
  • Indigenous peoples and the Criminal Law
  • Evidence Law

I have previously supervised:

  • Criminal Law and Justice
  • Evidence Law

 

Internship supervision

 

 

Philosophy & approach

Often the practical and moral importance of university learning is only realised when that learning is put in action. And, in terms of the law, too often this does not occur until the newly graduated are faced with the responsibility of making decisions that affect the lives of their clients, other participants in the legal process, and the wider community. With a rapidly expanding case load, it can be too late by then to learn the lessons missed. This creates an imperative: to take students, so far as possible, to the 'coalface' of practice, in order to inspire in them a sense of real purpose and relevance so they don't miss the opportunity that university learning offers.

Adopting this approach to teaching, Anthony endeavours to explicitly link theory and practice, and harness the potential of experiential learning.  Anthony takes the view that experiential learning is critical to the development of important graduate attributes associated with the practice of law, but is also essential to developing students' capacity to critique and challenge existing laws, legal structures and processes.

Anthony's experiential approach to teaching Evidence Law resulted in a University of Canberra Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning in 2010, and was the subject of a conference paper that received and award for the Best Legal Education Conference Paper at the Australasian Law Teachers Association Conference in 2009. This paper was subsequently published as,

  • Anthony Hopkins, ‘Teaching Evidence Law within the Framework of a Trial: Relating Theory to Practice as Students Take to Their Feet and Take Responsibility for the Trial Narrative’ (2009) 2(1&2) Journal of the Australasian Law Teachers Association 173.

Anthony's experiential learning approach has also been incorporated into a student focused text on the Uniform Evidence Law:

  • John Anderson and Anthony Hopkins, Uniform Evidence Law Guidebook (Oxford University Press, 2014).

Past courses

  • Criminal Law and Procedure
  • Evidence Law
  • Indigenous Australians and the Law
  • Advocacy

Updated:  10 August 2015/Responsible Officer:  College General Manager, ANU College of Law/Page Contact:  Law Marketing Team