Law Students take on Community Legal Education project in Myanmar

Yangon Downtown
Photo by: mydaydream/Myanmar, Creative Commons

We expect the students to come back feeling enthused about clinical legal education and the important role that it plays in legal education and access to justice.

Thirteen ANU College of Law students will have the chance to experience the teaching and operation of the law in a developing country, as they set off for the College’s inaugural Myanmar Clinical Program this week.

ANU Law has partnered with Bridges Across Borders South East Asia Community Legal Education, a non-government organisation (NGO) that works across South East Asia. One of BABSEACLE’s roles is to work with universities to introduce interactive teaching methods and clinical legal education.

In Myanmar, all law classes are taught in English, providing an opportunity for the Australian law students to help develop the English capacity of both law teachers and law students. ANU students will teach Myanmar law faculty in English about concepts such as access to justice, pro bono, professional ethics, with the aim of  developing faculty's capacity to design, teach and deliver clinical  legal education.

Associate Professor Vivien Holmes and Senior Lecturer Margie Rowe will supervise the students throughout the trip. A/Professor Holmes said the program will provide a wonderful opportunity for ANU Law students to learn about the relationship between law, legal education, the legal profession and society in a developing country transitioning to democracy.

“We expect the students to come back feeling enthused about clinical legal education and the important role that it plays in legal education and access to justice,” she said.

The students will spend five days training in the capital Yangon. A/Professor Holmes will then travel with five students to Pyay University, north-west of the capital and the other students will go with Ms Rowe to Dagon University, to spend two weeks working with the law faculty and students. The program is also a unit elective course designed for second and higher year Bachelor of Laws (LLB) or Juris Doctor (JD) students. The thirteen ANU College of Law students will join with law students from Queensland University of Technology and Swinburne University.
 

Updated:  10 August 2015/Responsible Officer:  College General Manager, ANU College of Law/Page Contact:  Law Marketing Team