Japanese delegation studies Australian legal system at ANU

Japanese students and scholars on the roof of Australia's Parliament House
Visiting students and staff from Aoyama Gakuin and Ritsumeikan Universities on the roof of Parliament House, during their two-week visit to the ANU College of Law.

It is so inspiring to see how Japanese students come to grips with the intricacies of Australian law, using a second language and within only two weeks,

Around two dozen students and staff from Japan’s Ritsumeikan and Aoyama Gakuin Universities are learning about the Australian legal and political system during a two-week visit to the ANU College of Law.

They’re among more than 200 people who have participated in the exchange program – run by the College in conjunction with ANJeL (the Australian Network for Japanese Law) – over more than a decade.

“Students receive an introduction to Australian law from our leading researchers,” says exchange coordinator, Associate Professor Heather Roberts.

“Stellar bilingual law students from ANU, coordinated by current Bachelor of Laws (Honours) student Scanlon Williams, are also providing pre-lecture briefings to the students to assist with their understanding of terminology.

“Many of the ANU students were part of the victorious INC team Australia that won in Japan in 2018.

“This is part of ANJeL’s goals of improving understanding between law communities in both countries.”

Students learn about various elements of Australian laws from scholars Dr Dominique Dalla-Pozza, Wendy Kukulies-Smith, Anne McNaughton, Dr Joshua Neoh, Dr Roberts, Professor Asmi Wood,  and Dr Michelle Worthington.

ANU scholars also learn from their visiting counterparts, Professors Stephanie Coop and Linkai Yang of Aoyama Gakuin University, and Ritsumeikan University’s Professors Michael Wolf and Wataru Sato.

The visitors have also toured Australian institutions including the High Court, Parliament House, and the Australian War Memorial.

“It’s a fantastic and enriching program, and is so inspiring to see how Japanese students come to grips with the intricacies of Australian law, using a second language and within only two weeks,” Dr Roberts says.

“It’s a privilege to be involved in an ANJeL program that’s been running for so long.”

Updated:  10 August 2015/Responsible Officer:  College General Manager, ANU College of Law/Page Contact:  Law Marketing Team