Five more questions before you graduate: Ruohan Zhao

Ruohan Zhao

Why did you decide to study law?

For me, the decision to study law was connected to my goal of becoming a more constructive citizen. Learning is not merely learning rules, but is about understanding (and challenging) the theories and assumptions which underpin our society and structure the way citizens and institutions interact with – and amongst – one another.

What was the best thing about your time at ANU College of Law?

ANU College of Law offered me the flexibility and opportunity to study a wide range of subjects and explore the areas I was interested in. For example, I came into contact with animal law, feminist legal theory, critical legal theory, law and literature, gender and the law and law and psychology – just to name a few!

What would you say to someone who is thinking about studying law?

Studying law is not easy, but it is rewarding once you find what you are passionate about. As lawyers often like to speak in dictums, some common pieces of advice are: law school is a marathon, not a sprint; truly learning the law is about embracing the process, not about your mark; and (most importantly) your law marks you get do not define your value or identity.

How did winning a prize help you?

My main research essay for the course was about cultural defences in criminal cases of violence against women and girls. Winning the prize strengthened my passion for intersectional feminism and the law, and also reaffirmed to me that this was an area I could continue pursuing in various ways after university.

What’s next?

I will be taking the rest of the year off to explore Central Asia, Xinjiang, and Europe, and, hopefully, stay in some housing co-operatives / communal housing projects along the way. In 2018, I will be moving back to New Zealand to commence work as a graduate at the Treasury in Wellington.

Updated:  10 August 2015/Responsible Officer:  College General Manager, ANU College of Law/Page Contact:  Law Marketing Team