CMSL Director in Chile to build ties

Image shows Associate Professor David Letts, second from left, with three officials from Universidad Mayor in Chile
From left: Veronica Nudman (Deputy Principal, Law Faculty, Universidad Mayor, Chile), Associate Professor David Letts, Professor Felipe Melendez (Principal, Law Faculty) and Professor Sergio Peña Neira, also of UM.

I am exploring research collaboration opportunities with Professor Peña Neira in the area of law of the sea and climate change to determine if we can engage in research that complements our discrete interests.

The Director of the ANU Centre for Military and Security Law is visiting Chile to see if it is possible to foster research ties with a leading private university.

Associate Professor David Letts is currently on OSP and is spending part of his time in South America as a guest of Universidad Mayor, an institution founded in 1988 with campuses across the capital, Santiago, and in the southern city of Temuco.

“While visiting Universidad Mayor, I am exploring research collaboration opportunities with Professor Peña Neira in the area of law of the sea and climate change to determine if we can engage in research that complements our discrete interests,” Professor Letts says.

“As well as talking with colleagues that share similar research interests, it is great to meet legal scholars that research in areas that are unfamiliar to me.

“For example, one colleague here did a study involving intellectual property rights between Chile and Peru for the name ‘Pisco’, a popular drink in both countries.”

Universidad Mayor was established 30 years ago and its law faculty is represented on campuses in Santiago and Temuco.

“The university’s law school teaches students during the day as well as in the evening so that undergraduate students who work during the day can study law at night,” Professor Letts adds.

As well as exploring research themes during his visit to the university, Professor Letts will deliver a lecture on how the law of armed conflict and security threats have developed over the past century.

“I’ll address whether this area of law is adequately coping with modern military and security threats including the use of cyber and maritime hybridity operations as elements of warfare,” he says.

“I will try and contextualise this discussion in order to assess its validity and application in the situation faced by South American countries.

“One of the challenges of visiting Chile is that not everyone I have met speaks English and I have almost no Spanish language skills.

“However, my point of contact has provided valuable interpretation assistance when needed.”

Updated:  10 August 2015/Responsible Officer:  College General Manager, ANU College of Law/Page Contact:  Law Marketing Team