Raising the age of criminal responsibility and disproportionate impacts on Indigenous youth

Date & time
6.30–8pm Wednesday 28 April 2021
Venue

Online via Zoom Webinar

Contact
ANU Law Marketing

Presented by Law Reform and Social Justice (LRSJ) Indigenous Reconciliation Project, ANU Law Students' Society (LSS)

Webinar
Raising the age of criminal responsibility

In light of last year's Council of Attorneys-General Meeting which involved a deferral on the decision to raise the age of criminal responsibility from 10 to 14 years old in Australia until next year, the debate around the issue has become more prominent than ever.

Join the ANU Law Reform and Social Justice (LRSJ) Indigenous Reconciliation Project and ANU Law Students' Society (LSS) in this webinar on raising the age of criminal responsibility and how the Council’s decision disproportionately affects Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth communities.

On our panel:
• Rodney Dillon, Indigenous Rights Advisor, Amnesty International
• Emma Towney, Solicitor, Dhurrawang Aboriginal Human Rights Program at Canberra Community Law
• Cheryl Axleby, Co-Chair of Change The Record

Speakers

  • Rodney Dillon »

    Indigenous Rights Advisor, Amnesty International

    Rodney Dillon is the Indigenous Rights Advisor for Amnesty International Australia. Rodney, a Palawa Elder, is a former Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) Commissioner for Tasmania. Rodney has been instrumental in the repatriation of Indigenous remains from overseas. He was awarded the NAIDOC male person of the year in 2006, a Tasmanian State Finalist for Australian of the Year in 2011, and won the Tasmanian Human Rights Award in 2013. His favourite achievement is the purchase of a sheep station on Bruny Island for the Aboriginal people of Tasmania."

  • Emma Towney »

    Solicitor, Dhurrawang Aboriginal Human Rights Program at Canberra Community Law

    Emma joined Canberra Community Law (CCL) in March 2019. In March 2021, Emma commenced as Program Manager of the Dhurranwang Aboriginal Human Rights Program. She is a proud Wiradjuri woman who has been residing in Canberra on Ngunnawal Country for the last 9 years. Prior to commencing at CCL, Emma worked in various legal roles within a Federal Government Department. Emma was admitted as a Lawyer in 2013 and holds a Master of Laws from ANU.
     
    Emma is also currently the Chair and a founding member of the ACT Law Society Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Justice Committee. This Committee was established to monitor and advocate on legal issues that impact Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People both within the ACT community and beyond.
     
    Emma’s current work at CCL sees her work within a small team to provide advice and representation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients in the ACT on social and community housing, social security and race discrimination. Her work is informed by human rights principles of participation, inclusion and self-determination and involves using human rights legislation and principles to support her client’s legal matters.
     
    In her spare time Emma volunteers as a run leader for a community led running and walking group - the ‘Canberra Deadly Runners and Walkers’. A group which uses running and walking as a tool to improve mental health and wellbeing by regular physical exercise. She has also recently found an interest in triathlons and is a member of TriMob, a First Nations Triathlon Team.

  • Cheryl Axleby »

    Co-Chair of Change The Record, and Former CEO of the Aboriginal Legal Rights Movement and Former National Co-Chair National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Legal Services (NATSILS)

    Cheryl is a proud Narungga woman with family ties across South Australia (SA). Since 2012 Cheryl has held the position of Chief Executive Officer of the Aboriginal Legal Rights Movement Incorporated, and she is currently Co-Chair of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services (NATSILS).

    In a career spanning 30 years, (10 working in the SA Government), Cheryl has worked towards achieving social justice and equity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in SA. During her career with the SA Government, Cheryl was a strong advocate for cultural inclusion within Government services delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

    Cheryl has over 25 years’ experience working within law and justice and has held the position of Chairperson of the Women’s Legal Service of South Australia, Alternate Deputy Chairperson of the then ATSIC Patpa Warra Yunti Regional Council, member of the Correctional Services Advisory Board to the Minister and Board member of Dame Roma Mitchell. She currently holds positions as a board member of Seeds Of Affinity, Reconciliation SA, Justice Reinvestment SA Working Group, the SA Coalition for Social Justice, Tandanya Aboriginal Arts Centre and the Aboriginal Prisoners Offender Support Services in SA.

    Before becoming CEO of ALRM, Cheryl developed cultural training programs within Families SA, was Manager of the Metropolitan Aboriginal Youth & Family Services from 2005-2010, and a Manager of Families SA office in the northern metro region.

    Cheryl’s vision is for every Australian to be ‘proactive’ rather than ‘reactive’ to the issues impacting on the quality of life for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander peoples.

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