Specialisations

The ANU College of Law provides students with the opportunity within their program to focus on a particular area of law. Specialisations at ANU require 24 units of study.

For more information please select your program below.


Bachelor of Laws (Honours) and
Flexible Double Degree – Law (Honours)

Students studying a Bachelor of Laws (Honours) or a Flexible Double Degree – Law (Honours) have the opportunity to work towards attaining the following specialisations:

  • Corporate and Commercial Law
    • This specialisation will provide students with an insight into the increasingly complex global and domestic commercial environment in which individuals and corporations operate. The courses in this specialisation focus on the governance and regulation of business and the legal issues that arise in commercial trading and transactions.
    • This specialisation gives students the skills necessary in corporate and commercial law to prepare them for a career in private practice, the private sector or within regulatory agencies or government.
  • International and Comparative Law
    • Developing skills in international and comparative law equips students for modern global and transnational legal practice. International law and institutions have an ever increasing relevance to domestic policy and legal issues. Comparative law provides students with the skills to understand foreign legal systems and the approach taken to resolving legal issues in other countries.
    • This specialisation will give students the skills necessary to navigate international and foreign legal system, particularly in the Asia-pacific region, with the opportunity to focus on areas of particular interest through a wide array of elective courses. It is highly flexible, allowing you to choose courses that suit your interests or that extend your knowledge in new directions. Whether you want to work in private practice, an NGO, within government or are looking to expand your legal knowledge, this specialisation provides the necessary skills and knowledge.
  • Law Reform, Environmental and Social Justice
    • Law reform and social justice is a central ethos in the ANU College of Law. Building on the College's extra-curricular Law Reform and Social Justice Program, this specialisation gives students the skills to explore and interrogate the complex role of law in society, and the part that lawyers play in promoting both change and stability.
    • Courses in this specialisation gives students the skills to evaluate current legal regulation of complex social issues, assess the relevant considerations in planning law reform and the necessary skills in executing reform. The diverse range of courses allow students to develop values of social justice and develop the skills necessary to achieve social justice goals.
  • Public Law
    • Studying Public Law involves students in examining both the process and product of government regulation and the underlying legal structures upon which government is built.
    • This specialisation combines comparative and multi-disciplinary perspectives in examining the design, implementation and effectiveness of regulation in Australia. The specialisation gives students the skills to develop a strong understanding of the modern regulatory state and the laws that govern its operation.
    • This specialisation allows students to choose courses that provide skills particularly suited for careers within government, regulatory agencies or private practice in public law.

On the Programs and Courses website, via the links in the list above, there is a list of courses under the study tab that can be taken to build each specialisation. Some courses can be counted towards more than one specialisation, provided they are listed on the Study Tab under the relevant specialisation. If students wish to request that a course be counted towards a specialisation that is not on the list; they will need to complete the application form below outlining the course of study chosen and how it satisfies the requirements of the specialisation learning outcomes. This could be an internship that has a focus on one of the areas of specialisation or a course studied at another institution; either in Australia or offshore. This will then be determined by the appropriate delegated authority and students will be advised of the outcome. Please be advised that a maximum of 12 units only can come from non ANU College of Law courses.

Students are responsible for registering their specialisations themselves, before they are due to graduate.

Undergraduate students who wish to add or change specialisations will need to do so through their ISIS account in the registration periods at the start of each semester. You will have two opportunities each year to make changes to your specialisations, up until your graduation.

  • Semester 1, 2021: 20 January - 31 March
  • Semester 2, 2021: 3 August - 31 August

To change your specialisation please use the following pathway from your ISIS homepage:
Navbar (small compass in top-right corner) > Navigator > ISIS > Degree Management > Major, Minor & Specialisations

Please note that you are indicating your intention to complete these specialisations only. The ANU College of Law will assess your eligibility for the indicated specialisations from the units you have completed when you are preparing to graduate.

Application to add a course that is not already listed under the relevant specialisation/s.

Before completing the application form, please ensure you have the following details about each course. Incomplete applications will not be progressed.

  • Name of Course
  • Course Code
  • The year the course was completed
  • A statement attesting to how the specialisation/s learning outcomes have been satisfied
  • Any specific assessment tasks that individually meet the learning outcomes of the specialisation/s

 


 

Master of Laws

Students studying a Master of Laws have the opportunity to work towards attaining the following specialisations:

  • Human Security Law
    • As the world's population nears 8 billion and the demand for resources increases, there is a need to understand the consequences of climate change, environmental and other natural disasters, conflict, pandemics, automation, under-developed economies, human rights breaches, and corruption. This specialisation will equip lawyers, professionals and policy-makers with the skills to assess critically topics that will explore these issues from a legal, regulatory and policy perspective.
  • International Law
    • International law regulates the relations between States and with other actors at the international level and can affect society in a variety of ways, both internationally and at the domestic level. It helps us to explain and analyse interactions in the international community and their impact within national societies.
    • This specialisation is highly flexible, allowing students to choose courses that are compatible with their current profession or that extends knowledge in new directions. Whether working in private practice, an NGO, within government or are looking to expand on legal knowledge for a future career – this program offers diversity, flexibility and knowledge suitable for a wide range of students.
  • New Technologies Law
    • Technology is transforming our society and global relationships. Industry and government need a new breed of lawyers who understand the legal, commercial and policy implications for the design and implementation of new products and new business models.
    • This specialisation will equip lawyers and other professionals with skills and scholarship needed to face novel challenges and to develop innovative and practical approaches to solving problems thrown up by new technologies.
  • Private Commercial Law
    • This specialisation will provide students with an insight into the increasingly complex global and domestic commercial environment in which individuals and corporations operate. The courses in this specialisation focus on the governance and regulation of business and the legal issues that arise in commercial trading and transactions.
    • This specialisation gives students the skills necessary in corporate and commercial law to prepare them for a career in private practice, the private sector or within regulatory agencies or government.
  • Public Law
    • Studying Public Law involves students in examining both the process and product of government regulation and the underlying legal structures upon which government is built.
    • This specialisation combines comparative and multi-disciplinary perspectives in examining the design, implementation and effectiveness of regulation in Australia. The specialisation gives students the skills to develop a strong understanding of the modern regulatory state and the laws that govern its operation.
    • This specialisation allows students to choose courses that provide skills particularly suited for careers within government, regulatory agencies or private practice in public law.

On the Programs and Courses website, via the links in the list above, there is a list of courses under the study tab that can be taken to build each specialisation. Some courses can be counted towards more than one specialisation, provided they are listed on the Study Tab under the relevant specialisation. If students wish to request that a course be counted towards a specialisation that is not on the list; they will need to complete the application form below outlining the course of study chosen and how it satisfies the requirements of the specialisation learning outcomes. This could be an internship that has a focus on one of the areas of specialisation or a course studied at another institution; either in Australia or offshore. This will then be determined by the appropriate delegated authority and students will be advised of the outcome. Please be advised that a maximum of 12 units only can come from non ANU College of Law courses.

Students are responsible for registering their specialisations themselves, before they are due to graduate.

Postgraduate students who wish to add or change specialisations will need to do so through their ISIS account in the registration periods at the start of each semester. You will have two opportunities each year to make changes to your specialisations, up until your graduation.

  • Semester 1, 2021: 20 January - 31 March
  • Semester 2, 2021: 3 August - 31 August

To change your specialisation please use the following pathway from your ISIS homepage:
Navbar (small compass in top-right corner) > Navigator > ISIS > Degree Management > Major, Minor & Specialisations

Please note that you are indicating your intention to complete these specialisations only. The ANU College of Law will assess your eligibility for the indicated specialisations from the units you have completed when you are preparing to graduate.

Application to add a course that is not already listed under the relevant specialisation/s.

Before completing the application form, please ensure you have the following details about each course. Incomplete applications will not be progressed.

  • Name of Course
  • Course Code
  • The year the course was completed
  • A statement attesting to how the specialisation/s learning outcomes have been satisfied
  • Any specific assessment tasks that individually meet the learning outcomes of the specialisation/s

 


 

Juris Doctor

Students studying a Juris Doctor have the opportunity to work towards attaining a specialisation from the completion of 24 units of study from the appropriate 4000 level courses and/or from the completion of 24 units of study from the appropriate 8000 level courses. This means that Juris Doctor students can elect an undergraduate specialisation and/or a postgraduate specialisation; provided the requirements are met.

Undergraduate Specialisations

  • Corporate and Commercial Law
    • This specialisation will provide students with an insight into the increasingly complex global and domestic commercial environment in which individuals and corporations operate. The courses in this specialisation focus on the governance and regulation of business and the legal issues that arise in commercial trading and transactions.
    • This specialisation gives students the skills necessary in corporate and commercial law to prepare them for a career in private practice, the private sector or within regulatory agencies or government.
  • International and Comparative Law
    • Developing skills in international and comparative law equips students for modern global and transnational legal practice. International law and institutions have an ever increasing relevance to domestic policy and legal issues. Comparative law provides students with the skills to understand foreign legal systems and the approach taken to resolving legal issues in other countries.
    • This specialisation will give students the skills necessary to navigate international and foreign legal system, particularly in the Asia-pacific region, with the opportunity to focus on areas of particular interest through a wide array of elective courses. It is highly flexible, allowing you to choose courses that suit your interests or that extend your knowledge in new directions. Whether you want to work in private practice, an NGO, within government or are looking to expand your legal knowledge, this specialisation provides the necessary skills and knowledge.
  • Law Reform, Environmental and Social Justice
    • Law reform and social justice is a central ethos in the ANU College of Law. Building on the College's extra-curricular Law Reform and Social Justice Program, this specialisation gives students the skills to explore and interrogate the complex role of law in society, and the part that lawyers play in promoting both change and stability.
    • Courses in this specialisation gives students the skills to evaluate current legal regulation of complex social issues, assess the relevant considerations in planning law reform and the necessary skills in executing reform. The diverse range of courses allow students to develop values of social justice and develop the skills necessary to achieve social justice goals.
  • Public Law
    • Studying Public Law involves students in examining both the process and product of government regulation and the underlying legal structures upon which government is built.
    • This specialisation combines comparative and multi-disciplinary perspectives in examining the design, implementation and effectiveness of regulation in Australia. The specialisation gives students the skills to develop a strong understanding of the modern regulatory state and the laws that govern its operation.
    • This specialisation allows students to choose courses that provide skills particularly suited for careers within government, regulatory agencies or private practice in public law.

Postgraduate Specialisations

  • Human Security Law
    • As the world's population nears 8 billion and the demand for resources increases, there is a need to understand the consequences of climate change, environmental and other natural disasters, conflict, pandemics, automation, under-developed economies, human rights breaches, and corruption. This specialisation will equip lawyers, professionals and policy-makers with the skills to assess critically topics that will explore these issues from a legal, regulatory and policy perspective.
  • International Law
    • International law regulates the relations between States and with other actors at the international level and can affect society in a variety of ways, both internationally and at the domestic level. It helps us to explain and analyse interactions in the international community and their impact within national societies. This specialisation is highly flexible, allowing students to choose courses that are compatible with their current profession or that extends knowledge in new directions. Whether working in private practice, an NGO, within government or are looking to expand on legal knowledge for a future career – this program offers diversity, flexibility and knowledge suitable for a wide range of students.
  • New Technologies Law
    • Technology is transforming our society and global relationships. Industry and government need a new breed of lawyers who understand the legal, commercial and policy implications for the design and implementation of new products and new business models.
    • This specialisation will equip lawyers and other professionals with skills and scholarship needed to face novel challenges and to develop innovative and practical approaches to solving problems thrown up by new technologies.
  • Private Commercial Law
    • This specialisation will provide students with an insight into the increasingly complex global and domestic commercial environment in which individuals and corporations operate. The courses in this specialisation focus on the governance and regulation of business and the legal issues that arise in commercial trading and transactions.
    • This specialisation gives students the skills necessary in corporate and commercial law to prepare them for a career in private practice, the private sector or within regulatory agencies or government.
  • Public Law
    • Studying Public Law involves students in examining both the process and product of government regulation and the underlying legal structures upon which government is built.
    • This specialisation combines comparative and multi-disciplinary perspectives in examining the design, implementation and effectiveness of regulation in Australia. The specialisation gives students the skills to develop a strong understanding of the modern regulatory state and the laws that govern its operation.
    • This specialisation allows students to choose courses that provide skills particularly suited for careers within government, regulatory agencies or private practice in public law.

On the Programs and Courses website, via the links in the list above, there is a list of courses under the study tab that can be taken to build each specialisation. Some courses can be counted towards more than one specialisation, provided they are listed on the Study Tab under the relevant specialisation. If students wish to request that a course be counted towards a specialisation that is not on the list; they will need to complete the application form below outlining the course of study chosen and how it satisfies the requirements of the specialisation learning outcomes. This could be an internship that has a focus on one of the areas of specialisation or a course studied at another institution; either in Australia or offshore. This will then be determined by the appropriate delegated authority and students will be advised of the outcome. Please be advised that a maximum of 12 units only can come from non ANU College of Law courses.

Students are responsible for registering their specialisations themselves, before they are due to graduate.

Juris Doctor students who wish to add or change specialisations will need to do so through their ISIS account in the registration periods at the start of each semester. You will have two opportunities each year to make changes to your specialisations, up until your graduation.

  • Semester 1, 2021: 20 January - 31 March
  • Semester 2, 2021: 3 August - 31 August

To change your specialisation please use the following pathway from your ISIS homepage:
Navbar (small compass in top-right corner) > Navigator > ISIS > Degree Management > Major, Minor & Specialisations

Please note that you are indicating your intention to complete this specialisation only. The ANU College of Law will assess your eligibility for the indicated specialisation from the units you have completed when you are preparing to graduate.

Application to add a course that is not already listed under the relevant specialisation/s.

Before completing the application form, please ensure you have the following details about each course. Incomplete applications will not be progressed.

  • Name of Course
  • Course Code
  • The year the course was completed
  • A statement attesting to how the specialisation/s learning outcomes have been satisfied
  • Any specific assessment tasks that individually meet the learning outcomes of the specialisation/s

 


 

Master of Financial Management and Law

Students studying a Master of Financial Management and Law have the opportunity to work towards attaining the following specialisation:

  • Private Commercial Law
    • This specialisation will provide students with an insight into the increasingly complex global and domestic commercial environment in which individuals and corporations operate. The courses in this specialisation focus on the governance and regulation of business and the legal issues that arise in commercial trading and transactions.
    • This specialisation gives students the skills necessary in corporate and commercial law to prepare them for a career in private practice, the private sector or within regulatory agencies or government.

On the Programs and Courses website, via the links in the list above, there is a list of courses under the study tab that can be taken to build each specialisation. Some courses can be counted towards more than one specialisation, provided they are listed on the Study Tab under the relevant specialisation. If students wish to request that a course be counted towards a specialisation that is not on the list; they will need to complete the application form below outlining the course of study chosen and how it satisfies the requirements of the specialisation learning outcomes. This could be an internship that has a focus on one of the areas of specialisation or a course studied at another institution; either in Australia or offshore. This will then be determined by the appropriate delegated authority and students will be advised of the outcome. Please be advised that a maximum of 12 units only can come from non ANU College of Law courses.

Students are responsible for registering their specialisations themselves, before they are due to graduate.

Master of Financial Management and Law students who wish to add or change specialisations will need to do so through their ISIS account in the registration periods at the start of each semester. You will have two opportunities each year to make changes to your specialisations, up until your graduation.

  • Semester 1, 2021: 20 January - 31 March
  • Semester 2, 2021: 3 August - 31 August

To change your specialisation please use the following pathway from your ISIS homepage:
Navbar (small compass in top-right corner) > Navigator > ISIS > Degree Management > Major, Minor & Specialisations

Please note that you are indicating your intention to complete this specialisation only. The ANU College of Law will assess your eligibility for the indicated specialisation from the units you have completed when you are preparing to graduate.

Application to add a course that is not already listed under the relevant specialisation/s.

Before completing the application form, please ensure you have the following details about each course. Incomplete applications will not be progressed.

  • Name of Course
  • Course Code
  • The year the course was completed
  • A statement attesting to how the specialisation/s learning outcomes have been satisfied
  • Any specific assessment tasks that individually meet the learning outcomes of the specialisation/s

 


Updated:  10 August 2015/Responsible Officer:  College General Manager, ANU College of Law/Page Contact:  Law Marketing Team